(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Peerage"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/peerage1968prin 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Emily Warren 
SSISTAHXEDTTOR-IN-CHIEF Pat Reed 

COPY EDITOR Mary Dalton 
BUSINESS MANAGER Marcia Raynes. 
SPONSOR Mr. Frank Peele 





1 ^ 
1 1 



1 •> 



PRINCESS ANNE 

. . . i£e 6uifcfin^ . . . i/ie people . . . /Ae aliiiucfe . . . 
. . . /Ae /earn/ny . . . /Ae essence oj^ CPrincess O^nne . . . yioiny 
// lis own persona/i/y . . . reyiec/i'ny a mocfe oj^ ^Ainliny l/iai 
se/s apari . . . ma£iny // a way oj^ fife o£uious /o a/f £u/ o//en 
ooerfoo£ecf in l£e necessary scramB/e Jor £nowfecfye . . . mucJi 
is /o £e remem£erecf . . . /nt/cA is Je// unsaicf 6ui siiff expressecf 
symSoficaf/y . . . 



DfDICflllOn 

MR. EDWIN CHARLES 
ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL 



18 



1954-1968 



DEDICATION 

In recognition of his leadership and friendly manner during his years 
at Princess Anne Higli School, we of the Peerage Staff wish to dedicate 
this 1967-68 PEERAGE to our retiring assistant principal, Mr. Edwin 
Charles. 

As assistant principal since 1954, Mr. Charles has proved his ex- 
perience as an administrator and a valuable faculty member. Mr. 
Charles is well qualified to serve in these capacities. He attended Hen- 
drix Academy and Hendrix College of Conway, Arkansas, and the Union 
University of Jackson, Tennessee. Returning to Conway, he received 
his A.B. degree from Arkansas State Teachers College. He also received 
a Bachelor of Physical Education degree from American College of 
Physical Education, Chicago, in 1930, and a M. Ed. degree from Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati, in 1938. 

Mr. Charles is certainly not lacking sports experience. He played 
football and baseball tiirougliout his undergraduate years and played 
jsemi-pro baseball in 1933. Still known as "Kinky" Charles (due to his 
tiglit curly locks?) to his close friends, he received honors as All State 
Football Tackle, All State Baseball Catcher, and Walter Camp's Honor 
IRoll of the South as a tackle. 

Mr. Charles has also served various occupations. Teaching high school 
classes, coaching football, baseball and basketball, serving as elementary 
school principal, camp counselor, and athletic director during the sum- 
mer months are among them. 

Considering his keen interest in sports and the enthusiasm with 
which he supports our team, one can only speculate the pleasure he 
imust feel over P.A.'s first undefeated season in his last year at Princess 
lAnne. 

Mr. Charles was born January 25, 1903, Faulkner County, Ark- 
kansas. His "wandering foot" has led him to work in schools in six 
states: Arkansas, Texas, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, and Virginia. He 
came to Virginia to teach at Creeds in Princess Anne County in 1949 
and has never wanted to leave. 

He has served as assistant principal at P. A. for fourteen years. Of 
course, these years hold some unforgettable experiences; one of which 
may be called "Operation Petticoat." One year a girl's petticoat was 
taken during gym. After all attempts to find it had failed, Mr. Charles 
called over the loud speaker for all girls to report to the gym. Then the 
female gym teachers conducted an inspection to discover the missing 
petticoat. Of course, the girl who had taken it had stashed it in a rest- 
room, where it was found later, before reporting to the gym. A sign on 
Mr. Charles's door the next day indicated that it would be some time 
before he lived down the title "Petticoat" Charles, but it seems that he 
finally has. 

There are two reasons why he has loved working at Princess Anne: 
first, working with Mr. Littleton and second, his relationships with the 
students and faculty. 

Mr. Charles says his greatest reward is when a student he has helped 
•eturns and thanks him. Princess Anne will certainly feel his loss for 
/ears to come. 






21 




friendly smile 



and twiniding brown eyes portray the 



196S Queen oj^ iJie CPeera^e 



MISS LAURIE HARRIS 



22 




Andrea Benda receives tie for 
third place. 




Ute Ward receives flowers from Linda Satter- 
field after being crowned Miss Princess Anne. 





Miss Princess Anne and her court. 




Laurie Harris ties with Andrea for 
third runner-up. 





Laurie Harris was chosen Miss Con- 
geniality by all the other girls in the 
contest. 



Diane Fox placed second in 
the five finalists. 



HOMECOMING 1967 




The Homecoming Court and their escorts: Tom Cooper, Audrey Stocks, Bill Simmons, Nancy 
Cooper, Charles De Joseph, Andrea Benda, Bobby Lewis, Martha Chevalier, Ray Strickland, 
Sally Frierson, Lem Marshall, Marilyn Thompson, Bill Barron, and Nancy Harris. 




Nancy, Andrea and Martha show their approval of the winning touchdown. 



The Cavaliers lush onto the football field ready to crash the Truckers. 



The Marching Band gives evidence of another PA victory. 



HOMECOMING 1967 

Coordinated by the tireless leaders of the S.C.A., Homecoming is a greatly anticipated highlight of the school 
year at Princess Anne. More than any other event of the school year, the Homecoming festivities are the combined 
efforts of all the students. The seniors witness another milestone in the last year of their high school career, and 
underclassmen take note of the satisfaction gained from hard work. 

A spectacle of noise and color, the excited shouts of a keyed-up crowd, the tension of a football game, the se- 
lection of a first place float, the thrill of crowning a queen, and the precision of the band and drill team are all ele- 
ments of Homecoming. All of this combined with the personalities and ingenuity of the members of the 1967-68 
school year make Homecoming 1967 one of the most outstanding celebrations ever at Princess Anne. 




Bill and Nancy circle the field as the crowd gives their approval. 





Nancy is given the place of honor at the Homecoming 
Dance. 



Trinity wins first place in float competition. 



27 




Andrea Benda 



HOMECOMING 
COURT 
1967 

Homecoming would not be complete without that special 

presentation of beauty at half-time the crowning of the 

Homecoming Queen. It is a moment of anticipation as the 
winner is announced for the first time. Traditionally, the 
S.C.A. and Varsity football team select five outstanding 
senior girls to vie for this title. This year, however, the 
nominating committee could only narrow it down to six 
contestants; of whom, the student body elected Nancy Harris 
as Princess Anne's 1967 Homecoming Queen. 

Nancy is a co-captain of the Varsity Cheerleaders and a 
member of Keyettes, Trinity Tri-Hi-Y, G.A.A. and the Senior 
Powder Puff Team. She was mayor of her city at Girl's State 
and was also selected by the contestants as Miss Congeniality 
in the 1967 Miss Princess Anne Pageant. Princess Anne will 
long remember her congenial and enthusiastic personality. 




Nanci Cooper 




Marilyn Thompson 



28 



CANDY CANE BALL 




CANDY CANE COURT AND THEIR ESCORTS: First Row, Left To Right: Sharon Edmonds, 
Susan Fahnley, Martha Chevalier, Andrea Benda, Jane McKown, Anita Booher Anne Zirpoli. 
Second Row: Mike Dunstan, BLU Felchner, Warren Cavey, Bill Yarbrough, BUI Brisbois Hiram 
Guerra Skeeter Whitlow. 




CANDY CANE QUEEN: 
cort Bruce Runyan. 



Sally Frierson with es- 



MAY QUEEN 
i 





MAY QUEEN COURT WITH THEIR ESCORTS: First Row, Left To Right: Susan Marshall, 
Bonnie Burbage, Betty Roberts, Karen Jones, Debbie Gunter, Dianne Marshall, Linda Wilkins, 
Barbara Taylor. Second Row: Bob Wooldridge, Pep Springston, Bob Cande, Bill Simmons, 
Bobby Lewis, Wayne Whitley, Joe McDaniels, Pete Carpenter. 



MAY QUEEN: Susan 
Robbie McBurney. 



Wolfe with escort 



JR. MISS PAGEANT 1967 



LINDA PHILLIPS, NANCY HARRIS, SONDRA STEEG REPRESENTIVE PRINCESS ANNE IN JUNIOR MISS PAGEANT. 




Nancy Hams 



MISS UNIVERSE VISITS P. A. 





32 




33 



Mr. J. Warren Littleton 
Principal 



Principal at Princess Anne since 1954, Mr. J. Warren Littleton has abundantly 
given of his time and talents, never ceasing in his efforts to promote the welfare of 
the student body. Mr. Littleton works closely with the students and has seen Princess 
Anne become one of the most outstanding high schools in the state, the recipient of 
many academic and athletic awards. Involved with the aspects of student life, Mr. 
Littleton decides school policy, encourages school spirit, and takes the necessary 
disciplinary measures. It is his desire to have Princess Anne maintain her present state 
of excellence. He is greatly respected by the students for bringing problems involv- 
ing privileges and discipUne before such groups as the S.C.A., allowing the students 
themselves to discuss possible solutions and suggest them to the faculty. 

A native of Eastern Shore, Mr. Littleton received his Bachelor's degree from the 
College of William and Mary, where he majored in Government. He received his 
Master's degree from the University of Virginia. He was a member of the Great Bridge 
High School faculty, and principal at Kempsville High before becoming principal of 
Princess Anne. 



34 




Mr. Edwin Charles, an assistant principal since 
1954, has proved to be a fine administrator as well 
as a cooperative member of the faculty. Coming to 
Princess Anne with a varied background, he has been 
able to benefit P. A. in many capacities. Enforcing 
discipline, leading the faculty, and supporting all 
athletic teams are only a few of his contributions. 
Mr. Charles's position of authority has been well- 
respected. 

Mr. Charles received his B.A. degree at Arkansas 
State Teachers College, his Bachelor of Physical 
Education Degree at American College of Physical 
Education, and his Master of Education Degree at 
the University of Cincinnati. This is Mr. Charles's 
last year at Princess Anne, and he will be greatly 
missed. 



Mr. Edwin Charles 

Assistant Principal 




In filling the office of vice-principal Mr. Pete 
Sachon has many responsibilities. He enforces dis- 
ciphne and strives to see that students uphold the 
rules and standards of Princess Anne. Mr. Sachon 
has attained both respect and admiration from the 
students through his friendliness and fairness in 
settling problems. 

After attending the Catholic University where he 
received his B.A. degree, Mr. Sachon later received his 
M.Ed, degree from the College of William and Mary. 



Mr. Pete Sachon 

Assistant Principal 



35 



COUNSELORS A TTEND STUDENTS' NEED 



The Guidance Department of Princess Anne High School is an integral part of 
the total educational program, assisting the individual student in developing a 
realistic concept of himself as an individual and as a member of society. In 
helping students attain this goal, the Guidance Department assists students in 
solving academic, personal and social problems; provides educational and voca- 
tional information; supervises the various testing programs and organize college 
and career programs. 

Mrs. Clelia Freeman, Director of Guidance is also twelfth grade counselor. 
Individual counseling is done by a staff of fine additional counselors assigned 
on a grade level basis. These counselors are: Miss Kathleen Hunter, eleventh and 
twelfth grades; Mr. Gerald Sandler, eleventh grade; Mrs. Beverly Cassidy, tenth 
grade; Mrs. Anne Owens, eighth and ninth and Mrs. Helen Braun, eighth grade. 
Mrs. Ethel Rittman is the guidance secretary. 




Mrs. Clelia Freeman 
B.S. Radford College 
M. Ed. William and 

Mary 
Guidance Director 
12th Grade 




Mrs. Helen Braun 

B.S. General Beadle 

College 
M.A. East Carolina 
8th and 9th Grade 




/ 

Miss Kathleen 
Hunter 

B.A. Mary 
Washington 
M. Ed. University of 

Virginia 
11th and 12th Grade 




Mrs. Beverly Cassidy 
B.A. Winthrop 

College 
M. Ed. WiUiam and 
Mary 
10th Grade 




Mrs. Anne Owens 

B.S. Madison 
M. Ed. WiUiam and 
Mary 
9th Grade 




Mr. Gerald Sandler 
B.S. Old Dominion 
M. Ed. University 
North Carolina 
nth Grade 




Mrs. Rittman 

Secretary 




36 



LIBRARY STAFF 



Providing the finest and latest hardbuok books, periodical 
literature, and research material, the library, under the super- 
vision of Miss Stallings, is an essential part of Princess Anne 
High School. The competent and efficient student assistants 
make locating a book quick and easy. In connection with the 
library, the audio-visual room maintains a large and varied 
collection of films, records, and tapes. 





Mrs. Ege Mrs. Jones Mis>> Stallings 

Audio-Visual Librarian Librarian 




_ t>^c. ENGLISH DEPA R TMENT RECEIVES 




Mrs. Shirley 
Armstrong 

B.A. Lawrence 
University 

English 8,10 




Mrs. Mary Barnes 

B.A. Westhampton 
English 




Mr. Frank Collier 
M.A. Edinburgh 
University 
English 12 




Mrs. Sara Culbert 

A.B. William and 
Mary 
English 




Mrs. Linda Davis 

B.A. Wake Forest 
English 




Miss Diane Dodson 
B.A. Mary 
Washington 
English 




Mr. Steve Lail 

A.B. University of 

North Carolina 
Journalism, English 




Mrs. Phyllis 

Heberling 
A.B. American 
University 
Speech 




Ml. William Moosha 
A.B. Atlantic 
Christian College 
English, Advanced 
Composition, World 
Literature 




Mrs. Christine 
Joyner 
A.B. East Carolina 
English 




Miss R.A. Perry 
B.S. Hampton 

Institute 
M.A. Hampton 

Institute 
English 




Mr. Lail, sponsor of the PAGE, reads over new 
addition with Leslie Pickering. 




Mr. Collier observes his English students taking a test. 



Words - sentences — paragraphs: These are concerns of the English 
Department. From a look at vivid verbs and colorful adjectives to an 
analysis of transitions and syntax, each student is encouraged to under- 
stand and appreciate his native language. His ability to communicate 
effectively will determine to a large degree the joy and satisfaction he 
will get" from life. 

Symbolism — philosophy — ideals: These, too, are concerns of the 
English Department. From an initial attack on abstractions to a provoc- 
ative study of transcendentalism and stoicism, every student is stimu- 
lated to delve into the underlying meanings of life. 

Besides presenting these basics of English study, the department, 
whose chairman is Mr. Harold Wheeler, offers enrichment courses in the 
specialized areas of speech, dramatics, advanced composition, world 
literature, and journalism. A special course introduced this year assists 
the student in improving his reading skills. 

The department is proud of its overall program and is especially 
pleased with its students' achievements: receiving honors from National 
Council of Teachers of English -tests, being recognized for quality work 
in regional poetry contests, getting advanced placement in college 
because of excellence in Uterary analysis, and generally doing accept- 
able work in colleges throughout the country. 



38 



SPECIAL HONORS FOR W 




Miss Elizabeth 
Predmore 

B.S. l onywood 
College 
linglisli 




Mrs. tiaynelle 
Richardson 
B.A. Uuccns College 
English 




Mrs. Lucy Sawyer 
A.B. William 
and Mary 
English 




Mrs. Miriam Stewart 

B.A. Carson- 
Newman 
Drama, Knglisii 



Mrs. Lurlene Trett 

B.A. Park College 
l;nglish 




Mr. Moosha takes time out. 




Mrs. Helen Waid 

B.S. Old Dominion 
English 




Mrs. Marie Wells 
B.A. Longwood 

College 

English 




Mrs. Gertrude Ward 

B.A. Old Dominion 
English 




Mr. Harold Wheeler 

B.A. LIniversity ol 
North Carolina 




Mrs. Mary Webster 
B.A. Seton Hill 
College 
M.A. 1. University of 
North Carolina 
Eniilish 




Mr. Larry Williams 

B.S. East Carolina 
English 





Miss Predmore helps a student with an assignment 
during study hall. 



Mr. Wheeler begins to plan his junior class's vocabulary test for the 
week. 



39 



LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT TEACHES CULTURE 




Mrs. Shirley Boyd 

A.B. Aquinas 
College 
M.A. L'niversite' 
De Laual 
French 




Mr. John Cauthen 

A.B. University of 

South Carolina 
M. Ed. William and 
Mary 
Spanish 




Students translate French as Mrs. Weaver reads lesson. 




Mr. Cauthen listens as a student translates a Spanish 
lecture. 





Mrs. Wanda Cutchins 
B.A. Old Dominion 
German 



Mrs. Joni Logan 

B.A. University 
of Florida 
Latin 1, 11 

The Foreign Language Department, under the direction of 
Miss Jewell Whitlock, has expanded until it now offers an 
extensive program in Latin, French, Spanish, and German. 
The courses are designed to meet the needs of both college- 
bound and non college-bound students. The courses stress 
an understanding of the culture, history, and literature of 
the countries, as well as the mechanics of the language. 

The modern languages are taught by the oral-aural 
method. Each room is equipped with a tape recorder, and 
two rooms are equipped with language labs. Modern equip- 
ment and methods and an extensive audio-visual library 
enable Princess Anne students to acquire better training in 
all phases of the language program. 




40 



Miss Whitlock prepares her lessons for the day. 



AND LITERATURE OF FOREIGN COUNTRIES 




Mrs. Elaine Orcutt 

B.S. Old Dominion 
Spanisli 




Mr. Frank Peele, Jr. 
B.A. I rcdcrick 
College 
M.A. Universidad 
Internacional 
Mexico 
Spanish 



8^ 




Mrs. Freddie Weaver 

A. B. liast Carolina 

B. S. Fast Carolina 

Irench 




Miss Jewell Whitlock 

B.A. .Mary 
Washington 
M. td. University 
of Virginia 
Latin 





Mrs. Cutchins reads over her German students' 
homework. 



oncentration, Concentration, Concentration . . . . 




Mrs. Boyd corrects a student's pronunciation of French. 




Mrs. Boyd looks over her lesson for 
the day. 



41 



SOCIAL STUDIES FORMS UNBIASED 




Mr. Kenneth Apschnikat 
B. A. Western Kentucky 

University 

Geography 




Mr. Richard Brown 

B. S. East Carolina 
University 
Geography 




Mr. Donald Carrow 

B. S. East Carolina 

Geography 
M.Ed. Education 




Mrs. Mary Commander 
B. S. William & Mary 
History 




Mrs. Dolores Fentress 
B. S. Longwood 
History 




Mr. E. E. Cox 

A. B. William & Mary 
M. A. University of Virginia 
Government 




Mr. Hope James, Jr. 
B. A. ODC 
U. S. & Virginia History 





Mr. William Eley 
B. S. East Carolina 
Government-History 




Mr. Carrow listens intently as a stu- 
dent questions him. 



Mr. Pursell lectures his class in U. S. Govern- 
ment. 




After school Mrs. Palmer makes plans for her class the next day. 



42 



OPINIONS IN STUDENTS 






Miss Carol Martin 

B. S. Longwood 
Geography & History 



Miss Alice McCoilum 

B. A. Winthrop College 
U. S. History 



Mrs. Fentress lectures to her class about the history 
of England. 



We live in a wonderful, yet dangerous world. The 
changes wrought in every area of human endeavor are so 
great that the average individual easily becomes engulfed 
in a sea of uncertainties, hardly able to chart a sensible 
course for his or her life. It is the providence of Social 
Studies to help the student find himself and his place 
in our every changing society. Social Studies seek to bring 
about proper adjustments to help students to think; 
plan and make logical decisions; to read critically and 
form opinions without bias and prejudice; to appreciate 
all that is best and lasting in our total culture; to live a 
happy and worthwhile life. Only in the development of a 
well adjusted personality in boys and girls, has the Social 
Studies fulfilled its place in the high school curriculum. 




Mr. Howard McKenzie 
B. A. Guilford CoUege 
M. A. University of Miami 
Government & History 




Mr. D. Wayne Pursell 
B. A. Randolph-Macon 
Government 




Mrs. Linda Medlin 

B. Ld. University of 
Miami 
International Relations 
& History 




Mrs. Roxanna Palmer 

A. A. Chowan College 
B. S. ODC 
History 




Mrs. Dorothy Wolfred 

B. S. ODC 
History & Sociology 





Mr. Eley gets a little rest while his Government class takes 
a test. 



Mr. Cox heads the Social Studies Department. 



43 



SCIENCE GIVES A COMPREHENSIVE 




V 



Mrs. Judith C. Battle 

B. S. Longwood College 
Physical Science 9 




Mr. James H. Bocock 
B. S. Old Dominion College 
Biology 





Mr. WUliam H. Cleaves, Jr. 

B. S. Shaw University 
Physical Science 




Mr. J. A. Linn 



Mrs. Mary MacLean 



M.T.S. William and Mary A. B. Mount Holyoke College 
Physics 



Princess Anne's Science Department, headed by Mrs. Mabel 
Taylor, offers a curriculum including general science, biology, 
chemistry, and physics. For students beginning science, a 
course in general science is offered as a preparation for more 
interesting and advanced study in specific fields. Botany and 
zoology, with particular emphasis on human anatomy, are the 
most important parts of the biology course. The students have 
access to microscopes, and fully-equipped dissection kits 
which make the course more exciting and easier to understand. 

The chemistry program emphasizes the chemical laws and 
principles and gives the students a comprehensive introduction 
to the structure and composition of everyday materials. 
The chemistry student has lab two days a week, enabling him 
to discover solutions to his own problems. 

A course in physics helps the student develop his ability 
to analyze natural occurrences by attempting to explain the 
fundamental principles of matter and energy in connection 
with its effect in mechanics, heat, light, sound, and electricity. 





Double, double, toil and trouble. 



Mrs. MacLean reviews for a Chemistry test with her students. 



44 



INTRODUCTION TO EVERY DA Y WORLD 




Miss Snow engaged with life science! 

45 



ALGEBRA MOST POPULAR 




Mrs. Wilma Anderson 

B. S. University of Missouri 
Geometry, Trigonometry 




Mrs. Helen Doyle 

B. A. East Carolina 
Unified Geometry 





Miss Maigret Bailey 

B. A. Elon CoUege 
Algebra 



Mrs. Nancy Davidson 

B. S. Madison College 
Mathematics 




Mrs. Patricia Ewell 

B. S. Westhampton 
Mathematics 




Mr. Robbins lectures his class. 




The Mathematics Department through its course offerings 
attempts to meet the needs of all students. 

In the college preparatory program Algebra is the most 
popular course. Three courses in algebra are offered. The es- 
sential fundamentals and the practical applications of this sub- 
ject are taught. Unified and Analytic Geometry are offered. 
In these courses the student studies the basic concepts of 
plane, solid, and analytic geometry. Trigonometry students 
learn simple trig ratios and how to apply them in solving 
practical problems. 

The students who desire a practical knowledge of mathe- 
matics for every day living or who need a good background for 
more difficult fields may take a course in general mathematics. 

The teachers in the department urge all capable students, 
whether college bound or not, to take the courses that will 
enable them to graduate with a general knowledge of algebra 
and geometry. 



Mrs. Knack explains logarithms to her Algebra II 
class. 



46 



MA THEM A TICS CO URSE 







i Mrs. Dorothy Jones 
B. A. Meredith College 
Math 



Mrs. Jones feels a headache coming on while trying to 
explain a problem to one of her more difficult stu- 
dents. 




Mrs. Carrie Knack 
A. B. Cornell Univ. 
Trigonometry 
Algebra 11 



Mrs. Sara Lane 

B. A. I!lon College 
Math 8, 9 





Mr. John W. Robbins Jr. Mr. E. F. Stanley 

B. S. CoUege of William & Mary B. S. Old Dominion 
M. Ed. University of Va. Algebra 11 

Algebra 111 Geometry 




Mr. Philip W. Williams 

B. S. Atlantic Christian College 
Algebra 1, Math 9 




Mrs. Jones teaches the fundamentals of Algebra. 



Mrs. Davidson works a problem to show her students 
how it is done. 



47 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT OFFERS 




Mrs. Mary Barber 

B.S. Madison 
College 
M. Ed. William 

and Mary 
Vocational Office 
Training 




Mr. Larry Jacobson 

B.A. Old Dominion 
Distributive 
Education 




Mr. Clifford Lewis 

B.S. Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute 
Distributive 
Education 





Mrs. Hortense Eason 
B.S. University of 
North Carolina 
Bookkeeping 
Typing 




Mrs. Luella Jones 

B.S. Northwestern 
State of Louisiana 
General Business 
Economics 




Mrs. Louise McAfee 

B.S. Old Dominion 
Bookkeeping 1 
Typing I, II 






Mrs. Kathleen 

Edmonson 
B.S. Madison 
College 
Typing, Notehand 



Miss Helen Estes 

B.S. Old Dominion 
Shorthand II 
Personal Typing 



Mrs. Vema Frey 
B.S. Tennessee 

Tech 
Typing I -COP 




Mrs. Mildred Lee 
B.S. Ohio 
University 
Typing II 
Business Law 

The goal of Distributive Education is to develop young people for 
careers in distribution and marketing. Through the years young people 
have been searching for a program which will develop vocational under- 
standing and provide work experience at the same time. D.E. is one of 
the best ways to fulfill this goal. 

There are two approaches to developing vocational understanding: 
The first is by the project study method which is offered to D.E. I 
students. These students most of which are not old enough to secure 
employment learn by conducting projects which simulate actual bus- 
iness situations. 

The second approach is to gain understanding by applying class 
instruction to the job. As the student learns new facts about market- 
ing and distribution he can see their practical application on his job. 
This approach is used in D.E. II and D.E. III. 

Topics covered in D.E. are: Personnel, Selling, Product Information, 
Sales Promotion, Merchandising, Marketing, Organization and Opera- 
tion. With a Background in the above areas you will be prepared for a 
career in distribution and marketing. 



Miss Marcia Pritchard 

B.S. Old Dominion 
Shorthand I 
Typing I 




Mrs. Edniondson catches two students up with 
past assignments. 



48 




Miss Pritchard listens as a student reads 
Shorthand. 



COURSES FOR VOCATION AL CAREERS 



The Business Department of Princess Anne offers courses 
for both vocational and college-bound students. The depart- 
ment, long recognized for its superiority and variety of 
available courses, is headed by Mrs.Verna Frey. For the future 
secretary and businessman, two courses in Gregg Shorthand 
are offered. Typing I and II furnish the students with the 
skills of touch typing and familiarizes them with the pro- 
cedures in typing business letters and other office corres- 
pondence. 

Bookkeeping I and II acquaints the future accountant 
with the procedures of bookkeeping. General Business and 
Business Law give the student a background necessary for all 
business employees. 

Business Economics has been added to the curriculum 
recently. Semester courses in personal typing and notehand 
aids the college-bound students by teaching them the skills of 
typing and short cuts in taking accurate notes. Courses in 
Clerical Office Practice and Vocational Office Training teach 
interested students how to operate many different office 
machines. This knowledge betters the students chances of 
getting an office job after graduation. 




Mrs. Lee instructs her students on the use of the electric type- 
writer. 




Mrs. Esmondson listens as a student names the parts 
of the typewriter. 



49 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEVELOPS FITNESS, 




ir. Donald VanBenschoten Miss Sharon Burkhart Mr. Arnold Davis Mrs. Doris French Mr. John Grady, Sr. 

A. B. Guilford College B.S. Old Dominion B.S. Old Dominion B.S.Radford B.S. East Carolina 

M.l-d. University of Physical Education Driver Training Physical Education MA East Carolina 

Virginia Physical Education 
Physical Education 




Mr. Al Habit Mr. Dennis Haglan Mrs. Carol James Mrs. June Lyons Mr. Harold Revis 

B.S. East Carolina B. A. William and Mary B.S. West Virginia B.S. Old Dominion B.S. Western Carolina 

Physical Education Physical Education Physical Education Physical Education M. A. Western Carolina 

Driver Training 




portant shot. 



The end of the day for Mr. Haglan. 

Mr. Tomko begins plans for the basketball season. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




SKILLS AND PROPER A TTI TUBES 




"Oh my leg! I know I pulled that muscle this time!" 




Coach Grady takes time out from liis many activities. 



Youth has particular needs at each stage of growth and 
development. An instructional and well organized pro- 
gram of Physical Education can help meet these needs. 

We see physical education as that phase of the educa- 
tional program that activates large muscle groups; instills 
knowledge of these activities; teaches knowledges that 
portray the underlying principles of sound health; initiates 
experiences directed toward desirable attitudes of social 
and personal development. Emphasis should be placed up- 
on achieving desired skills, definite goals of achievement 
positive levels of fitness achievement, and sound evalua- 
tion procedures. 

1. Development of organic strength and fitness and a rea- 
lization for the need of continuous fitness in post- 
scholastic life. 

2. Development of nuero-muscular skills and knowledge 
of the anatomical and physiological aspects that pro- 
duce these skills. 

3. Development of desirable character traits. Using the 
P. E. Class as a small laboratory, a cross-section of so- 
ciety emerges that produces experiences of social ad- 
justment. Provisions of adequate team and individual 
competition produces values of victory and defeat that 
cannot be adequately reproduced in any other scholas- 
tic situation. 

4. Development of practices and understanding of know- 
ledges relating to sound nutrition. 

5. Development of proper attitudes, habits and practices 
regarding prevention and control of communicable di- 
seases. 

6. Development of an understanding of, and an apprecia- 
tion for community health agencies and related ser- 
vices. 

7. Development of positive attitudes toward personal hy- 
giene that enables one to live more effectively at home, 
at school, and as a member of the community. 

8. Development of effective adjustment to personal and 
environmental problems and the responsibilities one 
faces in trying to achieve this adjustment. 




■ Now I'll pass this ball to you if he gets out of my way." Coach Grady gives team pep talk be- 

fore big game. 



HOME ECONOMICS PREPARES 





Mrs. Virginia Parker 
B.S. Madison College 
Home Economics 




Mrs. Enid Beazley 
B.S. Madison College 
Home Economics 



Mrs. Elliott Spencer 

B.S. University of 
North Carolina 
Home Economics 



The Home Economics program is offered as an elective for all high school 
girls. 

Sequence of courses is planned for Home Economics I, II, and III to provide 
opportunity for the development of educational experiences related to the 
students' growing responsibilities in family living and preparation for adult life. 

For girls who do not find time in their schedules for more than one year of 
Home Economics, a special one year program (Home Economics IV) is planned 
for senior girls. 

The many phases of study and participation in home and family life include: 
selecting, preparing, and serving food; selecting, caring for, and constructing 
clothing; improving housing and home furnishings; guiding the development of 
young children in the family; maintaining family health and caring for the sick 
in the house; planning for the use of the family income; self-improvement and 
contributing to happy family living. 

Students find excitement and rewarding encouragement in events correlated 
with classwork as modeling for the Kempsville Womans' Club Spring Luncheon 
and entering the Culinary Art Show. 




GIRLS FOR FAMILY LIFE 




Mrs. Beazley lectures on the definition and importance of straight of 
grain. 




Mrs. Beazley shows Barbara Reed the proper techniques of The students ask Mrs. Beazley's advice on some measuring 

sewing in arm hole facings. and cutting tips. 



S3 



STUDENTS DEVELOP SKILLS 




Mr. Ronald Collins 

B. S. Frederick College 
Band 




Mr. Clark Graves 
B.M.E. Shenandoah 
Conservatory of Music 
Vocal Director 




Mrs. Louise Lowenthal 
B. A. Radford CoUege 
Art 



Students enrolled in art classes at Princess Anne strive for 
three main objectives. The first is the activation of the sense 
of creativity. This is accomplished by observing the world at 
large. Students learn about the creations of nature through 
recognition and discovery. 

The second objective is to build a basic foundation of know- 
ledge by studying old masters of the past. Techniques and 
materials are also studied to further the students ability as an 
artist. 

The final objective entails exploration of the vast possibil- 
ities in the field of art. This exploration can be used as a method 



of choosing a career, and of helping one recognize the artistic 
value of all that he sees around him. 

In the field of music, Princess Anne's band and chorus con- 
tinue to excel. The Madrigal Singers and the A Capella Choir 
have been a source of pride to Princess Anne. They have earned 
many honors for their performances. The Madrigals have 
traveled to many areas entertaining audiences and meeting with 
success everywhere. The band also continues to merit attention 
by its many successful performances. These performances in- 
clude the football games and special concerts. The band is an 
essential part of Baccalaureate and Graduation each year. 






Mr. Collins practices with his band. 




Mr. Graves conducts the school chorus 
during a practice session. 



54 



IN FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT 




Mr. Collins is seen daily working with the Band. 



55 



Under the direction of Mr. Collins, the band performs 
for the students. 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 




Mr. James Allen Mr. Ernest Davenport Mr. Harvard Deen 

B. S. William and Mary B. S. ODC B. S. ODC 

Crafts and Electricity Industrial Arts Electricity 




Mr. Thompson demonstrates the skill needed in shop. 




Mr. Deen explains the fundamentals of electric currents. 



The Industrial Arts department of Princess Anne 
High School believes that Industrial Arts should be a 
part of the learning experiences of all students at all 
levels of grade and ability. These students should be 
exposed to the principles and concepts of industry by 
employing actual envolvement with tools, machines, 
and materials. Such envolvement demands technical 
skills and knowledge basic to most occupations and 
professions with a special stress put upon that vanishing 
concept of quality workmanship. 

Courses are offered in the following areas: Mechan- 
ical and architectural drawing. Graphic Arts, Crafts, 
Woods, Metals, Power Mechanics, Electricity, and Gen- 
eral Shop. All courses are open to both boys and girls. 
The General shop is an exploratory course which in- 
cludes nine weeks instruction in four areas, drafting, 
woods, metals and electricity. This course was designed 
for the eighth and ninth grades. All courses are elective 
and require no prerequisites. 




Mr. Eddy explains to a student how to correct a 
draft. 



56 



PROVIDES TECHNICAL SKILL 




If you can't do it riglit, don't do it at all! 




Rick Hendren listens patiently as Mr. Sloniker explains 
that grapes are not orange. 





Mr. Elmer Stamm 

B. S. ODC 
General Metals 



Mr. Avery Sumner 
B. S. Morida State 
University 
General Shop 




Mr. Joseph Thibodeau 

B. S. ODC 
Graphic Arts 




Mr. James Thompson 

B. S. ODC 
Wood shop 



Mr. Allen takes a breather. 




All you have to do is pull this thing-a-ma-jig, SEE! 
57 



ORBflnizflins 

58 



S.C.A. SPONSORS FOREIGN 




The 1967-1968 S.C.A. has certainly endeavored to promote 
educational advancement and democratic principles. It has 
been a busy and prosperous year for the S.C.A. 

Through the efforts of the tireless leaders of the S.C.A., 
many activities have been inade possible. New students were 
introduced to the school at the Orientation program held be- 
fore school started. They also took charge of season tickets 
sale and Homecoming festivities. For the first time at P.A. the 
S.C.A. sponsored a computer dance for which their foyer dis- 
play won first place. They also sponsored the traditional 
Christmas homeroom door decoration contest. To promote 
school spirit and enthusiasm, the S.C.A. sold school spirit rib- 
bons and held foreign exchange assemblies, bonfires, and pep 
rallies. Also among their projects were the faculty folUes and 
intra-state exchange with Fort Defiance. 

In the summer of '67, the S.C.A. sent three exchange stu- 
dents, Cathy Wright, Bob Wooldridge and Lem Marshall to 
South America. This school year we had two students, Hiram 
Guerra and Pearla Neuse, from Panama and Brazil respectively. 
It is a goal of the S.C.A. to strengthen international relations. 

For the year 1967-68, the S.C.A. received honorary recog- 
nition from the Virginia Student Cooperative Association and 
a Workshop Certificate of Achievement. 




Tom Cooper makes announcements to Senior homeroom. 



60 



EXCHANGE PROGRAM FOR '68 




Barbie Brytus, Becky Parsons and Andrea Benda help 
Mr. Cox prepare for a social event. 




Mr. Cox advises Tom Cooper in matters of importance pertain- 
ing to the S.C.A. 





INTRA -ST ATE STUDENTS: left to right: Jim Basquier, Cindy Tyson, Anita Barnliill, 
Becky Parsons, and David Samples. 





Homerooms send representatives to meetings of the S.C.A. and then return to report to each homeroom. 



MEMBER PLA CES A S FIN A LIS T 




THE NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY: Left to Right: Linwood Perry, Jeff Jewett, Mark Brinkley, Barbie Brytus, Lem Marshall, Susan White. 




Linwood Perry addresses Junior and Senior students at N.H.S. Tapping Ceremony. 



THE NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY OFFICERS: Left to Right: Treasurer, Mary Brinkley; Secretary. 
Susan White; Vice-President, Jeff Jewett; President, Linwood Perry. 



62 



IN N. H. S. SCHOLA RSHIP 




Linwood Perry conducts Tapping Ceremony. 



N. RS. 

One of the most distinguished organizations at Princess Anne High 
School is the National Honor Society. Only seniors are eligible for 
membership in this organization. Although the majority of the mem- 
bers are selected in the spring of their junior year, any students who 
wish to be considered for membership after the beginning of their sen- 
ior year are carefully screened, and if eligible, inducted in an impressive 
tapping ceremony. Requirements for membership are stiff. Scholar- 
ship, leadership, and service are only a few of the aspects of a student's 
personality that are considered in screening. All members are required 
to maintain a "B' with no grade lower than a t " throughout their higli 
school careers. 

As an honor society, the main goal of the N.H.S. is to provide scho- 
larships to deserving members of the Society. Therefore, the group has 
sponsored several fund-raising activities to provide money for these 
scholarships. Traditional projects of the Society are the sponsoring of 
the first dance of the year after the football game with Great Bridge 
and the supervision of the annual Junior-Senior Basketball Game. The 
National Honor Society also conducts many smaller projects to help 
raise scholarship funds. 

For the first time, this year a member of the Society, Jeff Jewett, 
Placed as a Finalist for the National Honor Society Scholarship. 




NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY NEW MEMBERS? Front Row, Left to Right: Donna 

Hampton, Cindy Viau, Rhonda Nicoll, Terry Brenneman, Kathy Wrihgt, Jesse Woods, 
Robert Wooldridge. Back Row, Left to Right: Billy Stephenson, Bonnie Montgomery, 
MoUye MacCleod, Jim Smith, Linda MacAnanny, Crouse Grey. 




1968 PEERA GE REFLECTS 




The 1967-68 PEERAGE STAFF: first row, left to right: Ann ZorpoU, 
Diane Goad, Melinda Harriss, Karen Jones, second row, left to right: 
Bobbie Berkstresser, Lelia Ingle, Emily Warren, Charlie Blalock, Chip 
Black, Sharon Grover, Becky Jones, Marcia Raines. 



SPECIAL RECOMMENDATIONS 

Mr. Donald Carrow, Darkroom advisor Sharon Grover 

Emily Warren, Editor Mark Chasteen 

Pat Reed, Assistant Editor Dana Pillow 

Marcia Raynes, Business Manager Mike Ennis 

Mary Dalton, Copy Editor Wayne Whitley 



9 



6 



7 



Many hours of thought, planning, work and dedication have gone 
into this PEERAGE you now hold in your hands in order to give you the 
most effective coverage of fond memories that we could provide. The 
staff members, chosen for their creative abilities and their willingness to 
work long hours, spend much of their free time in producing a first-rate 
yearbook. Sound of diligent annual staff members working busily on the 
PEERAGE issue from the annual room daily. 

Spastic photographers rush about the school snapping both candid 
and formal shots of students and faculty while editors identify pictures, 
sell advertisements, write copy, and lay-out page designs in order to meet 
important deadlines. 

The 1967 PEERAGE received a second place rating at Columbia 
University. The 1968 PEERAGE will be entered in the next contest at 
Columbia University, and a trip to New York at the time of the C.S.P.A. 
convention will be taken by the new editors for training. 



1 



9 



6 

8 



64 



A CTIVITIES OF SCHOOL YEA R 




Marcia Raynes, Business Manager. Mr. Peele, Advisor of THE PEERAGE, goes over pictures that have been taken 

for the annual. Photographers are left to right: Bill Hathaway, Mark Ingram, 
Mark Chasteen, Mark Shula, and Jim Wright. 




Roxanne and Ann work with Pat and Mr. Donald Carrow, Darkroom Advisor, works with new 

Dana with identification and lay-outs. members of the camera club. 



65 



P.A.NEWSPAPER TAKES 




THE PAGE: seated; Kacey Chuilli, Editor; left to right: Diane Goad, Staff Editor; Kathy Kennedy, Corr. Manager; Jeff Jewitt, Re- 
porter; Gretchen Lang, Reporter; Bill Kelly, Ad Manager; Charlotte Keith, Reporter. 




Kacey ChuUli, Editor of THE PAGE. 



Composed of the Journalism classes, the PAGE Staff is 
responsible for the publication of the school newspaper, the 
PAGE. Under the supervision of Mr. Lail, PAGE advisor and 
journalism teacher the staff has given the paper a new face: 
news briefs appeared in a special box on page one, and "Cam- 
el Column" and "Pickering Poll" were originated. In addi- 
tion to publishing eleven editions of the PAGE the staff 
sponsored the winter and summer issues of the Cavalier 
FOLIO and the "Letters to Santa" which were sold by the 
Journalism I Classes. 

In order to gain ideas to improve the paper, the staff visit- 
ed the VIRGINIAN-PILOT and LEDGER STARR Building. 
To emphasize the qualifications of the PAGE staff, Leslie 
Pickering, page three editor, writes Column for the ADVISOR 
and Kacey Chuilli, Editor-in-Chief, writes Column for the 
VIRGINIA BEACH SUN. The PAGE staff works hard and 
puts in hours after school and at nights. 

As a merit to the staff, their 1966-67 papers won first 
place award at Columbia Press Association meeting held at 
Columbia University. 

The H. C. Young Press in Norfolk is the printer of the 
school paper. 



66 



FIRST PLA CEATC. S. P. A . 




PAGE staff members hard at work just before a deadline are: left to right: Jackie Miller, Editorial Editor; Gretchen Lang, Re- 
porter; Charlotte Keith, Reporter; Linda Green, News Editor; Leslie Pickering, feature Editor; Kacey Chuilli, Editor. 





THE FOLIO STAFF: first row, left to right: Susan Pilly, 
Leslie Pickering. Jackie Miller, Linda Woods, Diane Goad, 
Linda Kelly, second row: Kacey Chuilli, Jan Benschop, 
Sheilia Dudley, Janice Aul. 



CHORAL DEPARTMENT 




FINEST IN TIDE WA TER 




The Madrigals donated their time to sing for several local organizations. 



The Princess Anne High School Choral Department, under the direction of Mr. Clark Graves, 
has received recognition as being one of the finest in the Tidewater area. The A Capella Choir and 
the Madrigal singers have both displayed much talent. 

A Capella Choir members, after auditioning for Mr. Graves, and passing the audition, receive 
instruction as a part of their regular school curriculum. The Madrigals are a voluntary group and 
receive no credits for graduation from participation. Madrigal members are also chosen by auditions. 

The choruses performed many times throughout the school year. These performances included 
the customary spring and winter concerts, and graduation exercises. The Madrigals donated their 
time to sing for several local organizations. Princess Anne's choruses are a source of pride to the 
school and the faculty. 



69 



SYMPHONIC BAND RECEIVES EXCELLENT RATING 




THE FABULOUS MARCHING CAVALIERS 




band would put their hats on backwards and march out of the stadium. 



IN DISTRICT II MUSIC FESTIVA L 




HIGH WOODWIND SliCTION: L. Marshall, L. Gregory, D. Davenport, K. Gallagher, L. Teehng, K. 
Kuzminski, R. Dick, K. Majors, V. James, P. Kohler, S. Timmerman, S. Dudley, C, McKinney, K. 
Williams, M. Wade, K. Copley, R. 1 reeman, S. Fiery, B. Bratten. 




LOW BRASS SECTION: Front Row, Left to Right: Bill Marchant, 
Scott Dazell. Jin|, Basgier. Mik e Teets, Richard Crowther. Back Row: 
James Krone /Bern ie Gav heart. Art Flowers, Frank Baldwin 




SAXOPHONE SECTION: Top to Bottom: Kenneth Miller, 
Tom Cooper. Jake Miller, Carl Webb. 




HIGH BRASS SECTION: First Row, Left to Right: Greg Dayton, Alison 
Benda. Second Row: Jackie Coleman, Bill Moon. David George. Russel 
Morrison, John Kingsly. Third Row: Doug PiUey, Tommy Tunstal, Dusty 
Boyd. Donald Morehead. 




LOW WOODWIND SECTION: seated, left to right: Beth Hawver, 
Dianne Hunter. Vicki I lanagan, Christine Carr. standing: David 
Tyree, Bill Brisbois. Jane .Moss. David Hamilton. 



71 




McCuUough, David George. 

1968 ALL REGIONAL: First Row, Left to Right: Alison Benda, Marsha Wade, 
Dianne Hunter, Vicki Flanagan, Loraine Gregory. Second Row: Steve Dunn, Lem 
Marshall, Mike Teets, John Kingsly, Emory Majors, Christine Carr. 




Jim Basgier 

72 



SHOWMANSHIP, LEA DERSHIP AND BE A UTY. 




THE CA V ALETTES BECOME 




ELITE MARCHING GROUP 




VARSITY CHEERLEADERS 




VARSITY CHEERLEADERS left to right: Diane O'Rouke, Rusty Harris, Julie Maskall, Ute Ward, Co-captains Marilyn Thompson and Nancy Harris, 
Becky Parsons, Sally Frierson, Martha Chevalier and Nanci Cooper. 



Many girls dream of becoming varsity cheerleaders, but a 
number of these girls would probably be discouraged by the 
realization of the hard work required to maintain this position. 
The select few of the varsity squad must give up their free time 
after school to practice, attend all football and basketball games, 
and must have plenty of school spirit to go with a ready smile. 
At away games these girls are the representatives of Princess 



Anne, and at home games they serve as congenial hostesses to the 
visiting school. 

With five girls returning from last year's varsity squad, in- 
cluding co-captains Nancy Harris and Marilyn Thompson, this 
year's squad was readily shaped up and has proven to be one of 
the best groups of cheerleaders Princess Anne has ever had. 




JUNIOR VARSITY CHEERLEADERS 




JUNIOR VARSITY CHEERLEADERS: Left to Right: Jenette Constantine, Helen Spence, Karen Jones, Diane Marshall, 
Nancy Spence, Sandy Alexander, Marcia White, Nancy Chevalier, Co-captains are: Susan Cande and Debbie Sakis. 



Like the varsity squad, the junior varsity cheer- 
leaders are chosen for their poise, personality and, 
above all, school spirit. These girls are untiring in 
their efforts to promote school spirit and create more 
interest in the activities of the junior varsity teams. 
They are also faithful in practicing long hours almost 
every day during football and basketball season. The 
J.V.'s sell school spirit ribbons and hold pep rallies 
before the games to arouse spirit in students and 
team. 

Under the leadership of co-captains Debbie Sakis 
and Susan Cande, the Junior Varsity Cheerleader 
squad has succeeded in keeping the student body 
informed of all sports related activities. As the year 
ends each girl anxiously awaits the spring and varsity 
squad try-outs. 




Co-captains Susan Cande and Debbie Sakis. 



Homecoming and the cheerleaders show their school spirit. 




CA VALIER BOOSTER CLUB PROMOTES SPIRIT 




CAVALIER BOOSTER CLUB: first row, left to right: Dan Robertson, Ronnie Cursey, Sherry Sharp, second row: Karen Smidt, 
Lydia Luna, BiU Kelly, David O'ChcU. third row: Bill Hathaway, Arnie Arneson, Walter Corliss, Joe Chapman, Pat Scott, fourth 
row: Kay Taylor, Lynn Kelly, Carol Jones, Jolui Chapman, Mark Chastine. 




Promoting school spirit is the ideal of the 
Cavalier Booster Club, better known as the 
Pep Club. Spirit ran high as it was such a 
great year at Princess Anne. The Pep Club 
prompted cheers for the undefeated Cava- 
liers. Constructing a school spirit chain for 
the Eastern Regional game with Hampton 
and organizing a pep rally before the game 
helped promote spirit. 




CAVALIER BOOSTER OFFICERS: left to right: Lynn Basguier, Eve Ahles, Tilson Cope- 
land, Jan Benshop, Don Miller, Mr. Apschnikat. 



80 



ICC ASSISTS CLUBS OF PRINCESS ANNE 




INTER-CLUB COUNCIL: first row, left to right: Linda Faris, Ginnic Stanley, Betty Bush, Sherry Conley, Rosemary Stallings, 
Diane F-isiier, Jane Moss, second row, left to right: Alice Hewett, Donna Cespcdes, Pamela Hancock, Susan Marshall, Barbie Bry- 
tus, Barbara Youngblood. third row, left to right: Jeff Jevvett, Jesse Poor, Guy Taylor, Tom Goopcr, Tim Henry, Bob Woold- 
ridge, Linwood Perry, Mr. Pete Sachon. 

The intent of the Inter-Club Council is to coordinate the activities of all school 
clubs. Each club elects a representative to attend the meetings and report on the activi- 
ties and problems that particular clubs have encountered. The I.C.C. is responsible for 
the scheduHng of all bulletin boards and foyer displays and this year repainted the I.C. 
C. Announcement Board. They maintained a Calendar of Events and show case for the 
school. The I.C.C. revised their evaluation system forjudging the clubs. To benefit the 
clubs, band and drill team, the I.C.C. sponsored a candy drive for two weeks. A schol- 
arship is awarded by the I.C.C, in the Mike Collins Memorial Scholarship Fund, to a 
Senior Club member who has contributed much effort to the club and who is in need 
of financial aid. 

SCIENCE CLUB STUDIES PROBLEMS OF MAN 



I 



I 



f l^i 



'it 



SCIENCE CLUB: first row, left to right: Bob Rice. LiikIu Brown, Donald Johnson, Susan 
Goad, Kathy Stanley, second row, left to right: Billy Stephenson, David Greenfield, Robert 
Cox, David Samples, John Chapman. 




SCIENCE CLUB OFFICERS: President, Donald Joh 
son: Secretary, John Chapman; Treasurer, Billy Ste 
henson. 



The Science Club strives to promote an awareness of the 20th cen- 
tury man and his problems, l^ed by Mr. Cleaves and Donald Johnson, 
the club participated in many interest and service projects. To further 
the knowledge of the students in the Science field, the club took field 
trips to the Great Bridge Planetarium, to Portsmouth for a fossil hunt, 
and to Norfolk for a Science Fair. 



81 



HI- Y, TRI-HI- Y CO UNCIL '6 7- '68 




Hl-Y-TRI-Y COUNCIL: first row, left to right: Mrs. Makowka, Ann Zir- 
poli, Helen Lanthier. second row: Gene Gerloff, Jane McKown, Marsha 

Wade, Susan Fahnley, Lonnie Rightmier. The Hi-Y, Tri-Hi-Y Council is the force which coordinates 

the assorted Hi-Y's and Tri-Hi-Y's at Princess Anne. Through the 
efforts of the Council, all the member clubs are provided with a 
forum in which to discuss common problems and their proper 
solutions. Representatives are carefully chosen from each of the 
clubs, and from this group Council Officers are elected. 

During the course of the school year, the Council sponsors 
the annual Candy Cane Ball. With the profits gained by this ac- 
tivity, the Council conducts its affairs. 



DEBATE TEAM OPTIMISTIC FOR NEW YEAR 



Patti Haywood and Dennis Morgan, affirmative, and 
Crause Gray and Jim Kelly, negative, do a splendid job 
representing Princess Anne in debate. The team participa- 
ted at the annual University of Richmond debate and re- 
ceived an invitation to the John Hopkins Tournament. 
Norcom High School also welcomed the Princess Anne 
team; the team brought back several awards. In 1967, the 
team won second in district and are hoping for first this 
year. 




The Debate Team prepares for competition. 




DEBATE TEAM: first row, left to right: Patti Haywood, Mrs. Hcberling. 
second row: Joe Chapman, Crouse Grey, Patty Middleton, Dickie Page, 
Martha Anderson, Jim Basguier, Dennis Morgan. 



82 



FRENCH NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY SPONSORS 
. . MOROCCAN 




SPEAKER 



The French National Honor So- 
ciety, under the direction of Mrs. 
Shirley Boyd, is an elite organiza- 
tion for French honor students. To 
benefit the members, a special 
speaker from Morocco attended 
one meeting and French films were 
shown. The club held a banquet 
and a Christmas party for the en- 
joyment of the members. At each 
meeting reports on the life in 
France are given. 



FRENCH NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY: left, front to back: Vice-President, Mary Brink- 
ley, Rhonda Nicoll, MoUyc MacClcod. right, front to back: President, Andrea Benda, Sue 
Barnhill, Bonnie Montgomery. 



BIBLE CLUB HOLDS MORNING DEVOTIONS 



The Bible Club strives to pro- 
mote a concern for religion 
throughout the school. Their ser- 
vice projects included special morn- 
ing announcements during Thanks- 
giving and Christmas, and a memor- 
ial service for the ones who were 
killed or injured on the U.S.S. For- 
restal. The club also sponsored a 
Blood Drive in the school for the 
Bloodmobile. Any student who is 
interested in the club may join. 




BIBLE CLUB: first row, left to right: Brian Ainley, Linda MacAnanny, Donna Hamp- 
ton, second row: Grace Yodcr, Cathy Aniey, Don Miller, Dorothy Voder, Elizabeth 
Taylor, Walter Corhss. 



83 



ART CLUB DEVELOPS ABILITIES 




ART CLUB: front row, left to right: Alice Hewitt, Diana Goad, Sue Pilley, ART CLUB OFFICERS: left to right: Terri Meredith, Sue Pilley, 
Terri Meredith, back row, left to right: Eve Ahles, Patricia Ziegler, Eric Parker, Diana Goad, Alice Hewitt. 
Herbert Liverman, Patricia Middlcton. 



Working to display the talents of its members and 
to interest other students in art and its many interest- 
ing fields, the Art Club does a splendid job. It does a 
fine job of setting up displays around the school. 




1967 CHESS TEAM UNDEFEATED 




CHESS CLUB: first row, around table, left to right: Tom Cooper, Gary Barnes, Jeff Jewett, Jim Hereford, Don Lazar. 
back row, left to right: Walter Corliss, Ken Osborne, Michael O'Connell, John Phillippi, Don Rudy, Bruce Frye, Dale Lazar, 
Terry Elliotte, Peter Baer, Don Corliss. 



Those people who have an interest in the ancient game of Chess 
comprise the membership of the Chess Club. Prerequisites for member- 
ship are the ability to play chess and an interest in the game. The Chess 
Club sponsors intra-team competition among members at all meetings, 
and fields a team consisting of the top five players who represent Prin- 
cess Anne in matches against area high schools. The 1967 team was un- 
defeated. 



84 



ELECTRONICS CLUB CULTIVATES INTERESTS 




ELECTRONICS CLUB: first row, left to right: Dan Lazar, Jeff Jewett, Walt Corliss, second row, left to right: Mitchel Lynch, Bruce Fry, Ken Os 
bourne, Terry I'Uiott, Don Rudy, Dale Lazai. third row, left to right: Pete Baer, Dan Corliss. 



Members of the Cavalier Elect- 
ronics Club seek to cultivate their 
interests in electronics. The club 
sponsored several Career Nights and 



participated in an all Virginia Beach 
Science Fair. To increase their 
knowledge of the field, they make 
many projects. 




i 




If 



'A 



Ll' 



A few of the club members experiment w ith a transistor radio. 



85 



LANGUAGE CLUB HELPS NEEDY FAMILY 




LANGUAGE CLUB: first row, left to 
right: Sandra Steeg, Herbert Liverman, 
Rhonda Nocoll. second row: Molly Mc- 
Cloud, Nancy Thompson, Connie Diaz, 
Terry Turner, third row: Sherry Conley, 
Kathy Zimmer. 



Under the direction of Mrs. Orcutt, the Lan- 
guage Club endeavors to promote understanding 
of, and interest in foreign languages and in the 
countries in which these languages are spoken. To 
promote their goals, they invited Hiram Guerra, 
foreign exchange student, to speak about his coun- 
try, Panama, and went to dinner at a Mexican Res- 
taurant. They also collected food for a needy fam- 
ily at Thanksgi\ang and sponsored a bake sale and 
car wash. The Club celebrated the holidays with a 
Christmas party. 




LANGUAGE CLUB OFFICERS: first row, 
Diana Lentz, President; Tim Henry, Vice-Pres- 
ident; Linda Lopez, Secretary. 



FN A SPONSORS MOTHER-DA UGHTER BANQUET 




Established for the encoiu-agement of girls who are interested 
in a career in nursing, the Future Nurses Club provides its mem- 
bers with the opportunity to be acquainted with this field. Trips 
to Norfolk General Hospital and the M.C.V. in Richmond sup- 
ply the members with information about the different fields of 



nursing. The club's service projects consist of making Thanksgiv- 
ing baskets and supplying a family of ten with food, clothing, 
and toys at Thanksgiving and Christmas. The members of the 
club also help out in the clinic during school hours. 



86 



JR. CI VITA N PROMOTES GOOD CITIZENSHIP 




JR. CIVITAN: first row, left to right: Susan Marshall, Hiran Gucrra, Pat Kohler, Gary 
Bloomingstcin, Sharon Self, Sandra David, second row: Donna Ccspides, Wayne Courtney, 
Patty Scluiler, Sue Barnliill, Peggy McCord, Brcnda Lehr, Trudy Chovvns, Kathy Mays, Terri 
Meredith, Kathleen Apple, Jaekie Miller, third row: Kathy Sjogren, Ken Osburn, Bill Price, 
Diedra Patton, Scott Deemcr, Jancie CUfton, Eric Parker, Elizabeth Taylor, Sheila Dudley, 
Debbie Canaday, Debbie Canaday. 




JR. CIVITAN Ol I ICI KS: left to right: Sandra David, 
Kathy Mays, Janice Clifton, Leni .Vlarshall, Sue Barnhill, 
Terri Meredith. 



The Junior Civitan Club works constantly to encourage good 
citizenship. Members enjoy the benefits of serving the school 
and the community, and works together to reach their goals. 
The Junior Civitan Club of Princess Anne works along with the 
Civitan Clubs of America. 

The club performs many projects during the school year. At 



Christmas, Thanksgiving and Easter they give baskets of food, 
clothing and toys to unfortunate families and sang and put on 
skits for the nearby nursing homes. Cleaning up Camp Civitan 
was another of their projects. Their Homecoming float won 
third place. In the spring, members attended the annual conven- 
tion in Williamsburg. 



Y -TEENS SPONSOR POWDER PUFF KING 




ALPHA-Y-TEENS: first row, front to back: Laverne Brown, Gail Houp, Robin Holt, second 
row: Barbara McGanty, Jackie Bullock, Laura Thompson, Peggy Milhgan, Pam Magger, Kathy 
Kear. third row: Vicky Patton, Debbie Smith, Helena Lubimov, Darlene Hughes, Rocky Mil- 
ler, Jane Anderson, fourth row: Rosemary KeUy, Karne Loden, Lee Shaeffer, Joanne Patton, 
Janet Clancy, Debbie Kulanzy. fifth row: Christine Oenbrink, Rodney Bowles. 




ALPHA-Y-TEENS OFFICERS: left to right: Janet 

Clark, Linda .McManus, Vivian McGanty, Ellen 
Hazelwood, Patty Talbert. 



The Alpha -Y- Teens, associated with the Young Women's Christian Association, feel it is their duty to 
spread Christian ideals throughout the home, school, and community. 

Each year the Y-Teens keep the many school plaques up to date and help needy famiUes during Christ- 
mas and Easter. They sponsor the Powder Puff King for the Powder Puff game and participate in the many 
Y.W.C.A. activities with other area Y-Teens. 



87 



A THEN A SPONSORS HONG KONG ORPHAN 




ATHENA TRI-HI-Y: Fiist Row, Left to Right: Millie Garrity, Sherry Conley, Vice-President; 
Ann Zirpoli, President; Donna Thomas, Treasurer; Tina Hetzer. Second Row: Jenny Thomas. 
Third Row: Alice Hewitt, Margie Bushower, Diane O'Connell. 



Athena Tri-Hi-Y, under the direction of Mrs. Davidson, sponsored 
numerous projects this year. As a group, they attended church, partici- 
pated in a car wash, and visited a home for elderly people. They sent 
money and gifts to the orphan they adopted in Hong Kong last year. 
Athena members attended the District Conference and also entered a 
float in the Homecoming parade. Around school. Athena has displayed 
many attractive bulletin boards. The girls had a little enjoyment too 
when they sponsored a slumber party for all members. Athena was mer- 
ited for their thoughtfulness and generosity with a certificate from the 
Christian Children's Fund. 




CA VALIER A TTENDS CITY CONFERENCE 




CAVALIER HIGH-Y: First Row: Left to Right: Phillip Hurd, Larry Garrett, Fletcher Hester Larr> Mahaliy , Scott Smith. Second Row: Leonard Cress- 
man, Pete Smith, Steve Gibson, Tom Maxwell, Pete Carpenter, Bobby Saul, Bill' Pearson, Bobby Wright. Third Row: Gene Alley, Russell Bourne, Steve 
Barlow. 



Under the direction of Mr. Collins, the Cavalier Hy-Y strives to be 
the most outstanding club at Princess Anne. Working to achieve this 
goal. Cavalier proposed a scholarship fund in Mike Collin's name and 
marched in the Patriotism march for Princess Anne. They also attended 
the city wide conference and along with Coronet sponsored activities 
such as a football game and a New Years' Eve Party for a Bayside Tri- 
Hi-Y. Their service projects consisted of cleaning up the school parking 
lot, the trophy case, and making up bulletin boards around the school. 



nuintn uiicn 

NOR RECEIVED 
AID ON THIS TEST. 





Cavalier's Officers car is a little different from the usual 




CAVALIER'S OFFICERS: First Row: Left to Right: Rick Hendren, Skee- 
ter WTiitlow. Gene Gerloff. Linwood Perry, L. J. Miles. Back: Left to Right: 
Chuck Herndon. Frank Marshall. 




Cavalier predicts P.A.'s state championship with their Home- 
89 coming tloat. 



CORONET SERVES SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY 




CORONET: first row, left to right: Chris Weaver, Jane Edwards, Kathy Mays, Diane Goad, Sandy Alexander, second row: Mary 
Welch, Sheila Vann, Starr Riggs, Peggy Levitt, Barbara Law, Mary Williams, Sue Maurice, Sharon Johnson, third row: Becky Mil- 
ler, Anne Sutton, Lynn Downing, Missy Crane, Lee Ann Snyder, Barbie Smith, Roxann Hogan. 





Coronet officers represent their club at Homecoming. 



Coronet Tri-Hi-Y is an organization interested in serving the 
school and community. The members took turns in patterning 
Mark, a paralyzed victim of an automobile accident, and took 
five orphans shopping one weekend. Coronet also sent Christ- 
mas and Thanksgiving baskets to needy families. The club spon- 
sored a football game with Cavalier Hi-Y to raise money. 




CORONET OFFICERS: first row, left to right: BUI Simmons, Tom 
Counter, second row: Debbie Lanthier, Cindy Midgette, Diane Marshall. 
^ Diane Hickman, Marcia White, third row: Sharon Edmonds, Debbie 
Mercer, Helen Lanthier. 



90 



KEY CLUB VOTED MOST OUTSTANDING CLUB 




KEY CLUB: first row, left to right: Larry Kight, Jeff Jewett, Lonnie Stroud, Randy Fowler, Warren Cavcy. third row: Bill Barron, Don Lane, 

Rightmicr, Linwood Perry, Jon Benschop, Danny Williard, Biff Pearson, Wayne Wright, Scott Smith, 1-rank Marsliall. Arthur Doloresco, Barry 

Jerry Miller, second row: Bob Gerloff, Bill Paulson, Jim Craig, I rank Cheatham, Howard Sykes. fourth row: Bob Rice, Donn Ward, Robbie 

Leonard, Terry Brenneman, Ralph Bamforth, Rick Hendren, William Gaskins, Ray Strickland, Jim Hardy, Bob Wooldridge, Tom Cooper. 



The club, under the direction of Mr. Dennis Haglan, re- 
ceived SI 00 from the Kiwanis Club for being the most out- 
standing club during the Kiwanis Jazz Festival. With their 
Peanut sale, money was raised for the Benefit for Crippled 
Children. The club also published the student directory. Key 



Clubs main objectives are to develop leadership, to serve the 
school and community, and maintain sound public opinion 
and high ideals which makes possible the increase of justice, 
patriotism, righteousness, and goodwill. 




91 



KEYETTES FIRST IN DISTRICT COMPETITION 




KEYETTES: first row, left to right: Lyrni Poff, Debbie Cannaday, Judy Banta, Pat Wright, Martha 
Chevalier, second row: Kathy Wright, Barbie Brytus, Andrea Benda, Missy Crane, Molly MacCleod, Ka- 
thy DuvaU, Susan Marshall, third row: Susan Miller, Perla Neuss, Nancy Harris, Jane McKnown, Daph- 
ane Via, Donna Ireland. 



The members of Princess Anne's Keyette Club involve 
themselves in projects benefiting school and community. This 
year the Keyettes held Christmas parties and an Easter Egg 
Hunt for under-privileged children, managed the Keyette 
Bookstore, sold Homecoming mums, and sponsored several 
spirit campaigns. Their greatest project each year, however, is 
the spectacular Miss Princess Anne Pageant. Profits from these 
activities go either for scholarships awarded to deserving senior 
Kayettes or to the International Keyette effort to aid migrant 
workers. 

P.A.'s Keyettes are justifiably proud of the honors their 
club has recieved. This year they ranked first in the Tidewater 
District Talent Competition and were named the outstanding 
Keyette Club in this district. 




Keyettes say "Lock up Those Truckers" with 
their Homecoming float. 





KEYETTE OFFICERS: left to right: John Hicks, Kathy DuvaU, Barbara WeUs, Guy Taylor. 



The Keyettes had a very attractive foyer decor- 
ation this year. 



QUO VADIS CONTRIBUTES TO RED CROSS 




QUO VADIS: first row, left to right: Maureen Patterson, Robbie Mc- bie Brenneman, Cindy Viau, Linda Paris, Libby Nobles, fourth row: War- 

Burney, Jack Horton, Barbara Carlin, Trudy Chowns, Linda Hill, second ren Cavey, Debbie Sakis, Lelia Ingle, Janet Clark, Cathy Combs, Pam 

row: Pat McGhee, Robin Egan, Pat Talbcrt, Nancy Fahnley, Becky Car- Whitley, Maria Garcia, Gerri Kxaemer, Bill Felchncr, Kathy Merritt. 
ter, Barbara Berkstresser. third row: Donna Dauer, Lindsey Porter, Deb- 



Under the direction of Mrs. Trett, Quo Vadis has completed 
some very honorable projects. Their major concern was to 
bring cheer to the soldiers in Viet Nam at Christmas time. 
They presented S75 to the Red Cross for Christmas bags to 
Viet Nam and provided Thanksgiving dinner for a family 
whose father was in Viet Nam. The club also sent Christmas 
stockings to boys in Portsmouth Naval Hospital from Viet 
Nam. Christmas caroling was another of their industrous pro- 
jects. Quo Vadis also received an invitation form the Social 
Director to the Naval Academy at Annapolis. To meet their 
expenses, the girls held a bake sale on board the U.S.S. Forres- 
tal. A reward for their fine work was the second place award 
that their float took at Homecoming. 



THE* 




Quo Vadis says "Teach the Truckers" with their Homecoming 
float. 




it T«l I'fi 



Quo Vadis expresses the schools feelings by using this foy- 
er display. 




93 



QUO VADIS: OFHCERS: left to right: Sponsor, Mrs. Trett; Susan 
Fahnley, Marilyn Horstman, Helen Menge, Treasurer, Betsy Bertz; San- 
di Merritt, Vice-President, Cheryl Cannon; President, Sandy Kiser; Rosi 
Cadorette. 



SCEPTER FOCUSES ON CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 




SCEPTER: fust row, left to right: Diane Dalby, Patty Jones, Clair Archi- 
bald, Adair Archibald, Lois Munden, Sharon Gross, second row: Beth 
Bratton. Monica Fazio, Marcia Wade, Debbie Canaday, Pat Cohler, Jackie 



Coleman, Sharon Roe, Jane Moss, Becky Peterson, third row: Fred A- 
kers, Monica Fazio, Dales Charles, Kathy Sjogren, Jo Ann Commander, A- 
nita Booher, Bill Brisbois. 




Scepter's projects for this year have been focused 
on extending Christian Fellowship into hospitals, or- 
phanages, and nursing homes. Scepter has given a bin- 
go party and tea for the elderly people in Holmes 
Nursing Home and conducted a Halloween party, a 
Valentines party and puppet show for the Children's 
Ward at Virginia Beach Hospital. Another target of 
their efforts was the Florence Crittenden Home for 
which the girls collected books and magazines. A 
needy family received compassion from Scepter in 
the form of stockings, candy, a food basket and a 
Christmas tree at Christmas. Second semester was 
concentrated on world service projects, especially 
Viet Nam. Scepter's efforts did not go unrewarded; 
the club received the Ace Award and first place in the 
foyer display. 



SCEPTER OFFICERS: back, left to right: President, Marsha Wade; Chaplin, Anita 
Booher; Treasurer, Pat Jones, front: Vice-President, Jane Moss. 




Scepter demonstrates remarkable art ability in making foyer display. 



Scepter officers are represented in Homecoming parade. 



94 



SIGMA PHI COLLECTS FOR MARCH OF DIMES 




SIGMA PHI: first row, left to right: Bill Heath, John Royall.Don ur Doloresco. fourth row: Doug Schepp, Kenny Miller, Edward Kelk, 
Ward, Don Lane, Howard Sykes. second row: Marsh Rightniier, Larry Thurston, Jimmy Craig, fifth row: Tommy Baker, Bill Sim- 
George Sallwasser, Danny WUliard, Richard Broun, John Brant, third mons, Crause Grey, Ron Wills, 1-rank Leonard, si.xth row: .Mike 
row: John Hicks, Warren Cavey, Barry Cheatham, Roger Lundy, Arth- Phelps, Guy Taylor, Bill Paulson, Conan Miller, George Truxillo. 



Sigma-Phi is a service club under the guidance of 
Mr. James, sponsor, and Lonnie Rightmier, president. 
Their goal is to promote high standards of Christian 
character in the home, school and community. For a 
service project they collected funds for the March of 
Dimes. The Club has made great strides in gaining 
more group participation. 




SIGMA PHI OFFICERS: left to right: President, Lonnie Rightmier; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Ralph Bamforth; Secretary, James Smith; Treasurer, Bob Rice. 




Sigma Phi officers presented at Homecoming. 




THETA ADOPTS INDIA N BOY 




THETA TRl-HI-Y: First Row, Left to Right: Debbie Kowalski, Donna Sturdevant, Cindy Snyder, 
Kay McEvoy, Linda Hill. Second Row, Left to Right: Millie Lyman, Debbie Midgette, JuUe Linsay, 
Debbie Gunter, Bonnie Burbage, Betty Roberts, Gail Matthews. Third Row: Left to Right: Joyce 
Touchton. Darlene Cupp, Nancy Cutchins, Renee Bell, Shirley Bonta, Mary Witham. 



I 




THETA 

As a service club, Theta, under the guidance of 
Mrs. Davis, sponsor, and Jane McKown, president, 
has fulfilled some very honorable goals. Through 
the Christian Children's Fund, the girls adopted a 
ten year old Indian boy, Michael Morris. Members 
helped pattern Mark Land, who is paralyzed, every 
two weeks. Also among their projects was to visit 
the Liberty House Nursing Home and to collect 
books for the STOP program. 

They presented a float-"Can the Truckers"— 
in the homecoming parade and a foyer display. 



THETA OFFICERS: First Row, Lett to Right: Pam Hancock. Jane Mc- 
Kown, Daphne Via. Second Row, Left to Right: Barbara Youngblood, 
Karne Bonta. 





TRINITY TRI-HI-Y: First Row, Left to Right: Diane Fisher, Kathy Moore, Belinda Stublin, Marcia Raynes, Lmily 
Warren, Barbara Brytus. Second Row: Barbara Wells, Barbara Snyder, Susan Woolle, Andrea Benda, Judy Banta. 
Third Row: Melinda Harris, Debbie Smith, Suzie Burcham, Perla Neuss, Nancy Harris. Fourth Row: Jeff Jewett, Bet- 
ty Harris, Peggy Byers, Laurie Harris, Theresa Toach. Fifth Row: Sally Frierson, Kathy Wright, Becky Jones, Jackie 
Sokol, Peggy McCord, Gigi Griffee. 



TRINITY FLO A T WINS FIRST PLA CE TITLE 



Throughout the school year, Trinity, un- 
der the direction of Mrs. McAfee, sponsors 
and participates in many activities. Members 
not only help in school by doing favors for 
teachers, selling I.C.C. candy, and working 
for the school bond issue; but, also, they 
help at home and in the community. They 
made toys to give to children that are burn- 
ed, sent food, clothing, and bubble gum to 
Viet Nam, and collected for the Heart Fund. 
Also, Trinity members sponsored Smile 
Week and Spirit Week to arouse school spi- 
rit. First place was awarded to Trinity's 
float at Homecoming. They also received 
Club of the Semester for the first semester. 




TRINITY OFFICERS: First Row, Left to Right: Terri Chisholm , Reporter; Ginni 
Stanley, Vice President; Elaine Vann, President; Ann Fugua, Secretary; Cindy 
Vann, Chaplain. Second Row: Linda Wilkins, Treasurer; Ginger Stewart, Corres- 
ponding Secretary. 




Trinity's float wins first place in competition. 



D.E. CLUB HAS A BUSY YEAR 




DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION CLUB: First Row, Left to Third Row, Left to Right: Ann Rumscy, Lee Hawley, Billy 

Right: Ron Wills. Don Miller. Larry Weast. Arnie Carroll, Thomas. Randy Sutton, Wayne Caudill, Bob Mungin, Mike 

Jimmy Ward. Charles Wulzer. Robert Miles. Second Row, Ncwbem Cindi Evans, Jeff Venable, Tom Priest, Nancy 

Left to Right: Lamar Hulett. Terry Crissell, Debbie Williams, Miller. 
Debbie Via, Jay Voss, L. J. Miles, Diane Lucas, Pat Ulrich. 



Under the leadership of Terry Crisell, the D. E. Club has completed a 
busy year. The Club actively participated in several conventions. The 
officers attended the District and State Leadership Conferences, and 
the club as a whole attended the City Rally. There was also enthusiastic 
participation at the District Contest Convention. At the end of the year 
the club held its annual Employer -- Employee Banquet. 




DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION OFFICERS represent their club at Homecoming. Driver, Jean Wright: front 
seat. President, Terry Crisell; back seat, left to right: Chaplain, Mike Whitley; Parliamentarian, Debbie 
Williams; Trea,surer, Terri Chisholm; Secretary, Debbie Via. 



98 



DRAMA CLUB PRESENTS "1984" 





DRAMA CLUB: First Row, left to right: Mrs. Mirian Stuart, Priscilla Bamforth, Bonnie Burbage, Robert Daughtrey. 
Second Row, left to right: Mike May, Doug Knacic, Tom Cooper, Gary Moore. 



Under the direction of Mrs. Mirian Stuart, the 
Drama Club seeks to encourage the students to 
participate in the field of Drama. The club spon- 
sors the production of several programs through 
the year. This year the club sponsored three 
one-act plays and presented the play "1984". 
The club also participated in the district one-act 
play competition. 





Drama Club practices for one-act play. 




DRAMA CLUB OFFICERS. Left to right: Pricilla Brad- 
ford, Bradley Dunham, Linda Phillips. 



99 



Linda Phillips and Mike May rehearse as the director gives a 
few pointers. 



J. 



F.B.L.A. RECEIVES A WARDS 




ftIO ON THIS TEST. 




FUTURE BUSINESS LEADERS OF AMERICA OFFICERS: First 
Row, left to right: Jackie Bullock, Pat Richardson. Second Row, 
left to right: Sue Sadler. Third Row: Grace Yodcr, Mary Rodz. 



FUTURE BUSINESS LEADERS OF AMERICA: First Row, left to 
right: Peggy Byers, Debbie Brenneman, Monica Giordano, Maria Garcia, 
Charlie Blalock. Second Row: Jackie Melfa, Sharon Smith, Pattie Tyrell, 
Cindy King, Lynn Kelly. Third Row: James Mendoze, Laurie Grum- 
back, Pat Kohler. 



F.B.L.A. 

Future Business Leaders of America, under the direction of Mrs. 
Edmondson and Miss Estes, have completed several projects. They 
conducted an annual candy sale and presented a float in the home- 
coming parade. For a Christmas project, the club carried fruit and 
gifts to a convalescent home. The members held a senior tea at the 
end of the year and took a field trip. As business is their interest, 
they sponsored contests in shorthand, typing and bookkeeping. 
The F.B.L.A. Club attended several conventions: regional at Old 
Dominion College, State at Richmond, and the national convention 
at Washington, D.C. Their hard efforts were rewarded when they 
were presented with the Gold Seal Chapter Award in June 1967 
at the National Convention. 




F.B.L.A. Officers represnet their club at Homecoming. 




F.B.L.A. enters float competition at Homecoming. 

100 



FHA DEVELOPS NEW PURPOSE FOR SCHOOL 




FUTURE HOMEMAKERS OF AMERICA: First Row, left 
to right: Kay McFvoy, C indce Liskcy, Candy Whittcn. Second 
Row, left to right: Peggy Davis, Paula Smith, Rose Cipolla, 
Debbie Bailey. Donna Lee. Beverly Wimbrow, Margie Keith, 
Pam Prentiss. Third Row, left to right: Mary Welch, Fve 
Ahles, Debby Troup. Barbara Moran, Linda Geisaka, Debby 



Frank, Donna Box. Joyce Cyrus. Fourth Row, left to right: 

Cindy Payne. Laura Alley. Mary Lang. Sherr\ Suajgcr. 
Jeanette Daniel, Susan Phillippi. Ijnily l-!ason. Shelia Lcedom. 
Fifth Row, left to right: Diane Haas, Susan Beck. Denise 
Weaver, Joyce Stephenson, Carol I'rizzel, Pam Burrow , Nancy 
Spratt, Chris Duff. 



The Future Homemakers of America Club 
has developed a new purpose for school in 
1967-68. The theme is Leisure Time -- Con- 
stuctive Time. The club is organized to help 
girls make the best use of their leisure time. 
Each month, the club plans meetings and 
outside activities to coincide with this theme 
and to benefit themselves and others. 







FUTURE HOMEMAKERS Ol AMERICA OFFICERS: First Row, left to 
right: Treasurer, Mary Welch; Secretary. Debb\ Frank; President. Linda 
Geisaka; Vice-President. Debby Troup. Second Row, left to right: Secretary. 
Joyce Cyrus; Reporter. Chris Duff; Historian. Donna Box; Chaplain. Fve 
Ahles; Parliamentarian. Barbara Moran. 



F.H.A. Officers circle the field during Homecoming Half-time. 



101 



FT A PROVIDES TUTORS FOR STUDENTS 




F.T.A.: First Row. left to right: Anne Gillie. Jeanne Ireland, Pat McGee. Diane O'Connell, Joy 
Englett. Second Row: Peggy Levitt, Betty Hooper, Roxanne Nunnally. Claudia Divers. Rose- 
mar\' Hamilton. Gerri Kraemer. Nannette Howard. Third Row: Michael Laughton. Linda Garris, 
Melanie Retzke. Becky Miller. Delores Marino. Sandra Stegg. Shirley Cartwright. 



The Future Teachers of America Club, under the direction 
of Miss Kathleen Hunter, provides excellent guidance for stu- 
dents who plan to enter the teaching profession. One of the 
club s most outstanding projects is the tutoring service for 
other students in the school. To help the members attain more 
knowledge of the teaching profession, they visit several colleges 
and also go to other area schools and observe the teaching 
practices of a class whose field they hope to endeavor. 




F.T.A. OFFICERS: First Row. left to right: Linda Cartwright, Secretary; 
Nancy Davis, Treasurer. Second Row: Donna Ireland, President. 




F.T.A. displays its float at Homecoming. 

102 




G.A.A.'s: First Row: left to right: Eva Benjamin, Susan Cande, Nancy Spence, Maria Claric, Helena Lubimov, Gail 
Matthews, Sue Maurice. Second Row: Laurie Grumbeck, Barbie Pfitzer, Nancy Thompson, Karen Hughes, Jackie 
Coleman, Kathy Matthew s, Jackie Weber. Third Row: Susan Miles, Pam Hancick, Kathy Draper, Ann Portert'ield, 
Sharon Self, Nancy Davis, Leanne Snyder. Fourth Row: Judy Croom, Terri Chisolm, Jackie Sokol, Laurie Harris, 
Peggy McCord, Eileen Smith, Linda Sparks, Jo Dee Morris. Fifth Row: Patty Shaffer, Peggy Millegan, Kathy 
Williams, Kathy Sjogren, Cindy Gerlach. 



The Girls' Athletic Association strives to promote more 
participation in athletic activities. All girls who are interested 
may join. The Junior-Senior Powder Puff game is sponsored by 
the club annually. A Date Night was also sponsored by the 
G.A.A. along with a Williamsburg trip for the Hockey Team. 
Money was raised by the club to purchase uniforms for the 
Hockey Team, also. Good physical fitness is a main objective 
for the G.A.A. 




G.A.A. Officer Car circles the field during Homecoming. 




VARSITY CLUB SPONSORS 




VARSITY CLUB: First Row, Left To Right: Pete Carpenter. Bruce Runyan, Lloyd Simon, Ed 
Love. Second Row: Bobby Levin, Chuck Herndon, Paul Ziegler, Glen Logan, Ray Strickland. 
Third Row:Jjfflm5cera^, Bill Barron, Sketter Whitlow. 



VARSITY CLUB 

Establishing a solid relationship between the athletes and the coaches as well as with other 
athletes is the main objective of the Varsity Club. Athletes who enter the Varsity Club must 
have lettered in any of the sports in which Princess Anne participates. 

The Varsity Club performs many projects throughout the year. They operate the con- 
cession stand and shoe check for all school activities in the gym, award letters to Varsity Ath- 
letes, provide cars for the Homecoming Court, and sponsors the annual Geek Week and Geek 
Week Dance. 




VARSITY CLUB OFFICERS: Left To Right: President, Wayne CaudiU; Vice-President, 
Tom Counter; Secretary, Bob German; Treasurer, Jack Spence; Sgt. at Arms, John 
Keifer. 



104 



GEEK WEEK AND DANCE 




VARSITY CLUB GOATS: First Row, Left To Right: Chris Sakis, Chuck KeUy. Second 
Row: Jack Horton, Bobby Gerloff, Robbie McBurncy, Tom Maxwell, Biff Pearson. Third 
Row: Arthur Deloresco, BiU Heath, Rick Hendren, Mike Johnson, Anthony West. Fourth 
Row: Steve Barlow, Ralph Bamforth, Mike Dunston, Daryl Keane. 




Officers of Varsity Club review plans for the 
meeting. 



9 f » ? 




Wayne Caudill conducts a meeting for the Club 




Bob German goes over the minutes of 
the last meeting with Wayne Caudill. 



Mr. Grady talks with club members 
before a meeting. 



THE 1967 FOOTBALL TEAM: First Row, Left to Right: R. MiUs. J. 
Cox, E. Love, P. Carpenter, T. Maxwell, C. Herdon, R. Hendren, L. 
Sisson, C. Sakis, C. Kelly; Second Row: R. Byrd, J. Spence, A. Dolores- 
co, J. Walker, R. German, J. Kiefer, K. Hughes, B. Cheatam, S. Smith, 
S. Sakis. Third Row: Coach Grady, Coach Habit, J. Beiler, P. Smith, M. 



Byrd, M. Johnson, W. Stancil, R. McBurney, B. Felchner, W. Caudill, B. 
Heath, L. Horton, Coach Haglan, Coach Moosha; Fourth Row: S. Bar- 
low, P. Green, B. Pearson, T. Counter. R. Gerloff, P. Ziegler, B. Run- 
yan, B. Harrell, M. Dunstan, C. Maddux, G. Truxillo, W. Godley. 



EA STERN DISTRICT CHAMPIONS 
EASTERN REGIONAL CHAMPIONS 
STA TE CHAMPIONS 



108 



DEFENSE 




Left to Right: Bruce Runyan, Pete Carpenter, Ed Love, Mickey Byrd, Robert Gerloff, Jaci< Spence, Wayne Caudill, Steve Sakis, John Kiefer, 
Paul Ziegler, Lloyd Sisson. 





p. A. RIPS THROUGH G.B. 



P.A.-40 



G.B.-O 



Princess Anne took the Great out of Great Bridge. 
The Cavaliers ended the visiting Wildcats unbeaten 
streak at 27 games, 40—0, before a crowd of 10,000. 
Quarterback Bob German passed for four touch- 
downs- twice each to ends Tom Counter and Bruce 
Runyan— and the rest of the Cavaliers played as 
though they thought they were the best in the Eastern 
District high school football. 

Early in the game while it was still a contest, it 
was the Princess Anne offensive line that was super. 
The interior line of Bill Felchner, Jimmy Walker, Bob 
Gerloff, Mike Johnson, and Bill Heath that opened 
gapping holes for fullback John Kiefer and a pair of 
small, quick halfbacks, Tom Maxwell and Pete Car- 
penter. Kiefer and Carpenter both ran for touch- 
downs. 

Meanwhile, the Cavalier defense held Great Bridge 
to 24 yards in the first half. Paul Ziegler, Steve Sakis, 
Wayne Caudill, and Ed Love led the defensive charge, 
as Lloyd Sisson, Jack Spence, Mickey Byrd, and Car- 
penter intercepted a pass apiece. Great Bridge didn't 
penetrate the Cavalier 30-yard line until the games 
closing moments. 

Neither team scored in the first period, but with 
less than a minute gone in the second period, German 
found Counter wide open in the corner of the end 
zone for a 33-yard touchdown. Midway through the 
period, a good punt return by Carpenter and a 10- 
yard run by Maxwell set the stage for Kiefer's score— 
a 13-yard jaunt through one of the gapping holes the 
line kept opening. German ran and passed Princess 
Anne 59-yards to another score, the payoff on a 6- 
yard flip to Runyan, 19 seconds before intermission. 
That and two Counter placements made it 20—0 at 
the half. 

In the second half. Carpenter ran 4-yards for a 
touchdown and German passed 7-yards to Runyan 
and 55-yards to Counter for two more touchdowns 
giving the Cavaliers a 40—0 victory. It was one of the 
most lopsided form of reversals in recent years. 




Bob German gets the ball from center Robert Gerloff . 




Gives the ball to Maxwell 




who sets the stage for a pass to Counter 




which leads to one of the many touchdowns scored against Great 
Bridge. 




A score and a victory in the air! 

ROBERT GERMAN THROWS 4 SCORING PASSES 

110 



CA VALIERS STOMP CITY RIVAL 



P.A.-33 F.C.-6 

End Tom Counter caught two touchdown passes 
as Princess Anne won its second victory of the young 
season. Quarterback Bob German threw two touch- 
down passes, one covering 4-yards to tiglit end Bruce 
Runyan. German's second toss covered lO-yards to 
Counter. Counter's other touchdown reception came 
from Quarterback Steve Barlow for 1 1 -yards. 

Late in the first period the Cavaliers moved 77- 
yards in nine plays with German hitting Runyan for the 
first score with German adding the conversion. John 
Kiefer blocked a First Colonial punt and linebacker 
Mickey Byrd recovered it on the Patriots 10-yard 
line. On the first play, German threw to Counter in 
the end zone. First Colonial came back with a 72- 
yard drive and did what Great Bridge could not do, 
score on the Cavalier defense. At intermission the 
score was 14-6 Princess Anne. 

As the third period began Princess Anne marched 
80-yards on the ground for the third touchdown, with 
Pete Carpenter scoring from the 21. In the fourth 
period John Kiefer scored with a 6-yard plunge 
through the Patriot's line. The final tally came on a 
brilliant second effort by Counter on a 1 1-yard pass 
from Barlow. 




German receives protection as he sets to throw. 




Defense closes in on a Patriot. 




Maxwell follows blockers for a long gain. 




TOM COUNTER CATCHES 



TWO TOUCHDOWN PASSES. 





Kiefer on defense. 



R. Byrd on offense. 



German runs for a short gain. 



ALERT PRINCESS ANNE SHOCKS GRANBY 




P.A.-l! 



GRANBY- 13 



A defensively alert Princess Anne team turned a 
fumble recovery and a blocked punt into touchdowns 
in the final minutes of piay and upended the defend- 
ing State Group 1-A champions. 

Granby scored first in the game with a 93-yard 
touchdown pass that gave the Comets a 6-0 lead late 
in the second period. The Cavaliers took the ensuing 
kickoff and marched 78-yards for the tying touch- 
down. Only a minute was left in the half when Robert 
German dove into the end zone from 1-yard out, but 
Counter's conversion attempt was blocked. As the 
half ended, it was all locked up at 6-6. 

The Comets received the second half kickoff and 
broke the 6-6 deadlock in three plays with the touch- 
down coming on a 47-yard touchdown pass giving the 
Comets a 13-6 lead. The last Comet threat was a field 
goal attempt at the seven that was blocked, from there 
the Cavalier defense took over. Late in the fourth 
period, with less than five minutes left in the game, 
Wayne CaudilFs jarring tackle on the Granby halfback 
caused a fumble. Paul Ziegler, the defensive end, re- 
covered on the Granby 18-yard line and John Kiefer 
scored from the seven on a great effort with 4:43 left 
in the game, as the conversion attempt was wide. The 
Comets still led 13-12 and were receiving the Cavalier 
kickoff. Four plays later the Comets ran out of downs 
and were forced to punt. Ziegler came through with 
his second big play of the night, by blocking the punt 
with 2:50 remaining in the game as Mickey Byrd re- 
covered on the 1-yard line. Kiefer scored his second 
touchdown from the 1-yard line giving the Cavalier's 
an 18-13 lead with 2:36 remaining. The Granby quar- 
terback tried desperately to connect on another long 
pass, but the Cavalier safety. Jack Spence, intercepted 
and put Princess Anne on the Granby 12-yard line as 
the game ended. The last two touchdowns were be- 
hind the blocking of tackle Bill Felchner, as defensive 
tackle Steve Sakis bottled up the Comet running 
attack. 







CAVALIERS TOPPLE DEFENDING STATE CHAMPIONS. 



LAST SECOND PA SS D UMPS TR UCKERS 




P.A.-27 



CHURCHLAND-20 



Bob German tossed a pass to tight end Bruce Run- 
yan for the winning touchdown with seven seconds 
remaining in the game. It was the fourth straight win 
for the Cavaliers as Churchland suffered its first de- 
feat of the year. 

Churchland scored first on a 7-yard touchdown 
pass that sent the Cavaliers to work. German came 
back with a 56-yard touchdown pass to halfback Tom 
Maxwell and a 6-yard plunge by Maxwell for a 13-7 
advantage, but Churchland grabbed the lead at the 
half at 14-13. 

As the second half started neither team could get a 
drive going. Early in the fourth period the fireworks 
began as the Cavaliers recovered a fumble and march- 
ed 29-yards for the score with John Kiefer diving over 
from the 1-yard line. Tom Counter kicked the extra 
point giving P.A. a 20-14 lead. Churchland tied the 
score on a quarterback keeper, 20-20. Kiefer with the 
aid of Bill Felchner blocked the Churchland conver- 
sion. 





BRUCE RUNYAN CRADLES THE WINNING PASS AGAINST 
CHURCHLAND 



113 



CA VALIER DEFENSE BE A TS NORVIEW 



PA. -7 



Norview— 



Princess Anne's stout detense smothered two last 
minute drives to give tiie state's No. 1 ranked Cavaliers 
their 5th straight victory. 

The first time the Cavaliers got the ball they 
marched 60-yards for the first and only score of the 
game. The 10 play touchdown drive featured a 15- 
yard screen pass and a 1 7-yard run by halfback Tom 
Maxwell. John Klefer belted through the middle to 
the eight, then bulled his way off left tackle for the 
touchdown. Bob German kicked the extra point with 
less than 4 minutes into the first period giving the 
Cavaliers a 7-0 lead. 

Norview struck back with a 57-yard drive that was 
halted at the 1-yard line by a great defensive stand. 
With fourth down and 1-foot to go the Norview quar- 
terback tried to carry it over. He was nailed by Steve 
Sakis and Kiefer. Twice in the fourth period Norview 
was turned back at the Princess Anne 19-yard line, 
once on a fumble recovery by Sakis and once on 
downs. Ed Love, Mickey Byrd, Robert Gerloff, Bill 
Felchner, Wayne Caudill joined Sakis and company in 
making it difficult for the Pilots. The defensive end 
play of Bruce Runyan and Paul Ziegler kept Norview 
scrambling on crucial situations. Jack Spence, who 
replaced injured Gernian at quarterback, came up 
with a big defensive play by breaking up a sure Nor- 
view reception. 

The win was Princess Anne's fourth over Norview 
in the last 6 years. 




Kiefer goes off left tackle for only touchdown. 




Ma.wvell follows blockers on screen pass. 




Carpenter goes high to 
gather in a pass. 




German looks for a receiver. 



Counter battles Norview defender for pass. 



flips to Maxwell and throws a block. 



PRINCESS ANNE'S DEFENSE SPEARHEADED BY SAKIS AND KIEFER 



114 



p. A. ROMPS NO. I RANKED DEFENSE 



P.A.-24 



KELLAM 



The Kellani Knights charged the P.A. goal line the 
first time they got their hands on the ball, but ran out 
of downs. It was the last threat to the Cavaliers by 
Kellam. Robert Gerioff grabbed a loose ball at the 
P.A. 39-yard line to set up the Cavaliers first touch- 
down in the second period. On third down at the 44- 
yard line Bob German dropped back and threw long 
to end Tom Counter streaking straight down field. 
Counter caught the ball behind the Kellani secondary 
at the 30-yard line and ran untouched for the first 
score. German added the first of 3 extra points. 

The second Cavalier touchdown capped a 57-yard 
drive that ended with a 9-yard pass from German to 
end Bruce Runyan, as he leaped high in the end zone 
for the catch. 

Princess Anne began its third touchdown drive 
when defensive end Paul Ziegler pounced on a Kellam 
fumble, at the P.A. 49-yard line. German moved the 
Cavaliers into Kellam territory quickly with a 25-yard 
pass to halfback Pete Carpenter. Jack Spence took 
over as Quarterback and threw a 9-yard pass to Run- 
yan, a 5-yard pass to Carpenter to give Princess Anne 
first down on the Kellam 9-yard line. Three plays 
later Kiefer scored giving Princess Anne a 21-0 lead. 

German made it 24-0 early in the fourth period 
with a 24-yard field goal after the Princess Anne 
drive had bogged down. German got another shot at 
the crossbar minutes later after Gerioff recovered 
another fumble, but missed. 




Kiefer makes short gain for first down yardage. 




Kiefer rips the line behind the blocking of Johnson and Carpenter. 




Barlow outruns Kellam Imebacker. 



Counter slips behind defense for 
a reception. 




German threads the needle as Carpenter catches pass be- 
tween two defenders. 



Runyan shps after receiving pass. 



115 



P.A. BEST IN DISTRICT. 



p. A. MASTERS HORNETS 






P.A.-27 DEEP CREEK- 19 

Fullback John Kiefer scored three touchdowns on runs of 63, 13, 
and 4-yards to lead Princess Anne over a stubborn Deep Creek team. 
Kiefer carried 16 times for 213-yards, the best single-game perform- 
ance by an Eastern Region player this season. 

On the first play of the second quarter, Kiefer broke through right 
tackle and sprinted 63-yards to the end zone. Robert German added 
the first of three extra points that gave the Cavaliers a 7-0 lead. 

Deep Creek taking over on a pass interception drove 63 - yards mid- 
way through the third period for a score, but the extra point was 
missed. 

Kiefer scored his second touchdown of the night after Mickey Byrd 
recovered a fumble at the Hornet's 28-yard line. With 32 seconds re- 
maining in the third period Kiefer scored from the 13-yard line. Kiefer 
set up his third score by carrying a pitchout 53 yards to the Deep 
Creek 12-yard line. Two plays later he plunged through the Deep Creek 
line from the 4. 

The Hornets scored twice more on the passing of their quarterback, 
throwing a 5-yard score to their tight end and a 1-yard dive by their 
fullback. P.A.'s final score was set up by a fumbled punt recovered by 
Biff Pearson. Pete Carpenter carried over on the next play, giving the 
unbeaten Cavaliers their seventh straight victory. 






KIEFER HAS BEST INDIVIDUAL GAME IN DISTRICT. 




116 



CA VA LIERS TR O UNCE A DM IRA LS 



P.A.-35 CRADOCK-13 

Pete Carpenter ran for three touchdowns and Jack Spence 
led a determined pass defense to down the upset minded 
Admirals. 

The first score climaxed a 60-yard drive as Carpenter dove 
through the middle from 20 yards out and Bob German added 
the extra point. Cradock came back with a 78-yard touch- 
down pass to tie the game at 7-7. In the second period John 
Kiefer intercepted a pass at the Cradock 35, that put the 
Cavaliers in good field position. Kiefer carried to the two, but 
fumbled into the end zone where he and Runyan recovered 
for a touchdown. Four plays later the Cavalier defense held 
and blocked a punt that Mickey Byrd recovered and scam- 
pered 15-yards for the score, giving the Cavaliers a command- 
ing 21-7 lead at the half. 

As the third period began Princess Anne drove 66-yards 
with Carpenter scoring from the 16-yard line breaking tackles 
as drove into the end zone. His other score came in the fourth 
period capping a 39-yard drive with Carpenter scoring from 
the 1-yard line. Spence led the defense by intercepting 2 of 4 
interceptions. 

P.A.'s big six, Paul Ziegler, Steve Sakis, Wayne Caudill, 
Robert Gerloff, Ed Love, Bruce Runyan limited Cradock to 
only 6-yards rushing. 







/ 




9 



CARPENTER STARS FOR P.A 




CA VA LIERS SH UT O UT BA YSIDE 




P.A.-19 



BAYSIDE-0 



Princess Anne the State's No. 1 ranked football team ex- 
tended its winning streak to 9 straight with a 19-0 victory over 
Bayside. The Cavaliers first two touchdowns were set up on a 
blocked punt by Paul Ziegler and a fumble recovery by Ed 
Love, and defensive linebacker Mickey Byrd intercepted a de- 
flected pass in the end zone for the other touchdown. 

Taking advantage. Princess Anne clinched a berth in De- 
cember's Eastern Regional playoff. Bayside's first time with 
the ball, ran 3 plays, lost yardage 3 times and took too long 
trying to get off a punt. Ziegler blocked the kick and recovered 
on the Marlin 1. Bob German threw his 11th touchdown pass 
of the year to split end Tom Counter. 

Ed Love deflected a pitchout at the Bayside 7-yard line. It 
took fullback John Kiefer just two smashes at the line to make 
it 13-0 at the half. 

In the second half, the Marlins stopped Kiefer twice from 
the 1-yard line to take over on downs. Bayside attempted a 
pass in the end zone that was deflected in the arms of Byrd 
giving the Cavaliers the lead 19-0. The alert Cavalier defense 
finished the game with 4 interceptions and 3 fumbles recovered 
by Ed Love. The Princess Anne defense held Bayside to —1 one 
yard rushing. Ziegler, Love, Byrd, and Steve Sakis were out- 
standing on defense. 




I 



Counter catches bomb. 




Carpenter gets pitchout. 



IT 

German sets and fires . 





German pitches to Pearson while being tackled. 



ED LOVE RECOVERS 3 FUMBLES. 




. a buUet to Counter. 



118 



p. A. FINISHES UNBEA TEN 



P A. 46 



COX-0 



Princess Anne Cavaliers coasted easily to their first perfect 
season and a shot at the state championship with a 46-0 romp 
over Cox. The Cavaliers now go into the Regional Playoff 
December 1, against once beaten Hampton. 

Fullback John Kiefer scored two touchdowns, both on 
1-yard plunges. Halfback Pete Carpenter also scored twice on 
a 24-yard pass play and a 90-yard punt return. Bob German 
ran his aerial touchdown total to 13 for the season with pay- 
off strikes to Bruce Runyan and Carpenter. Princess Anne 
scored every time it gained possession of the football in the 
first half to lead 27-0. Carpenter fielded the Cox punt on the 
10-yard line and threaded his way 90-yards up the side line 
to give the Cavaliers a 34-0 lead. Coach Grady emptied the 
bench midway through the third period. The final pair of 
touchdowns came from two J.V. halfbacks, Haxter and Hes- 
ter. 





A JV player scores his first varsity touehdown in rout over Cox, 
another city rival. 



P.A.'s defense closes in on ball carrier. 





Kiefer upended at the one yard line. 

While being hit. Counter catches pass. 



Kiefer sprints ahead of Cox defenders. 



P.A.'s FIRST PERFECT SEASON. 



119 




PRINCESS ANNE EDGES HAMPTON 





PRINCESS ANNE- 16 



Two blocked punts by All-Tidewater tackle Bill Felchner and 
Bob German's sharp passes carried Princess Anne to a 16-14 vic- 
tory over Hampton and the state high school football champion- 
ship. The victory was the 17th straight for Princess Anne, the 
1 1th in the schools first perfect season. 

It started as though it might become a Princess Anne rout. 
The Cavaliers lost the toss— for the ninth time in 1 1 games— and 
kicked off. Hampton could not move the ball and forced to 
punt after 3 plays. Felchner rushed the kicker and got a hand on 
the ball, which skittered off to the side. John Kiefer grabbed it on 
the first bounce and streaked down the left sideline. Barely two 
minutes into the game, the first of German's two placements 
made it 7-0. Another kickoff, another punt and the Cavaliers 
set off on a drive that carried from their 23 to the Hampton 41. 
Then a holding penalty shoved them back and the Crabber's 
mighty defense, the "Mean Machine," asserted itself. 

Hampton recovered Carpenter's fumbled punt on the Prin- 
cess Anne 34. Two plays later, and end-around provided the ty- 
ing touchdown with 1:50 left in the half. The Mean Machine 
limited Princess Anne's attack to 71 yards total. 



SXAXE# ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 



FOR ST A TE TITLE 





Star In Playoff 




HAMPTON- 14 



In the second half, German's passes were like sand to the 
Mean Machine. Princess Anne received the kickoff at their own 
31 -yard line. German passed to Bruce Runyan for 9-yards, to 
Biff Pearson for 13 yards, and to Tom Counter for 17-yards be- 
fore the drive stalled at the Crabbers 35-yard line. German punt- 
ed— a beauty that rolled dead on the 3-yard line. Hampton man- 
aged— 1 yard in 3 plays and were forced to punt out of their own 
end zone. Felchner rammed through again and got more than 
his hands on the ball this time. The ball sailed out of the end 
zone for a 2 point safety that made it 9-7 with 1 : 54 to go in the 
third period. 

Princess Anne got the ball right back and moved 57-yards in 
9 plays to increase its lead. The big plays were passes to Pearson 
for 23-yards and 11 -yards to Carpenter. Shortly after the fourth 
period began. Princess Anne was in a fourth down situation at 
the Crabber 3. German rolled to the right, looked for Pearson, 
his primary receiver, and spotted Runyan in the middle. Runyan 
fairly collapsed around the ball for the most important of his 
five receptions. German's kick gave the Cavaliers a 16-7 lead with 
10:30 left in the game. 

For the next 9 minutes Hampton's longest gain was 2-yards. 
Carpenter intercepted a pass and by the time the Crabbers got 
the ball back it was all but over. They scored on a 1 2-yard pass 
making the score 16-14 Princess Anne. Hampton tried an onside 
kick, but center Robert Gerloff fell on the ball with 30 seconds 
left in the first Eastern Regional Playoff, protecting its first 
State Championship. 



IS OURS! 




F.A. BRINGS FIRST STA TE 




ROBERT GERMAN-THE MOST VALUABLE PLAYER AWARD 

JOHN KIEFER-AWARDED THE MOST OUTSTANDING PLAYER IN VA. BEACH. 



CHAMPIONSHIP TO VA. B. 








ALL-METRO 1967 

OtYcnsc 

Tom Counter end 
Bill l ekhner- tackle 
Mickey Byrd-guard 
Second Team 
Robert German -back 
ALL-TIDtWATKK 1967 
I-'irst Team 
Tom Counter end 
Bill I- elcliner tackle 
John Kiet'er-back 
Honorable Mention 
Steve Sakis- tackle 
Mickey Byrd-guard 
ALL LASTLRN DISTRICT 
Tom Counter-end 
Bruce Runyan end 
Bill Felcliner- tackle 
Bob Gerloff-center 
Robert German quarterback 
John Kieter-back 
ALL EASTERN REGIONAL 
Tom Counter-end 
Bill Felchner-tackle 
ALL-STATE 
Tom Counter-end 
Second Team 
Bill Felchner-tackle 
Honorable Mention 
Bob Gerloff-center 
Robert German- back 
John Kiefer-back 



Dc tens'.- 

Bruce Runyan end 
John Kiefer linebacker 



Second Team 
Bruce Runyan end 
Bob Gerloff-center 
Robert German- back 





THE 1968 BASKETBALL TEAM: First row, left to right: Jack Spense, Gene Alley, Don Evans, Jerry Miller, Richard Crowther, Mike McCully, Skeeter 
Whitlow. Second row: Coach Harold Revis, Bob Gerloff, Bill Barron, Paul Ziegler, Tom Counter, Bob German, Sam Gettle. 



BASKETBALL 



124 



p. A. FINISHES WITH 12-10 RECORD 





p. A. 79 Cox 45 



P. A. 60 Kellam 36 





127 

P. A 76 Norview 63 



m 



p. A. 66 Maury 87 



P. A. 78 F. Colonial 47 




P. A. 85 Norview 34 



P. A. 51 Granby 43 




p. A. 34 Hampton 50 




WRESTLING 




Coach Davis with team captain Steve 
Henderson. 



132 





THE 1967 BASEBALL TEAM: kneeling, left to right: manager, J. 
Johnson; scorekeeper, W. Whitley; Coach, N. Fields: manager, P. Jamer- 
son; standing, left to right: R. Strickland; B. Simmons: B. Lewis, B. 



Saul; T. Blake; M. Keleher; D. Ward; B. Link; J. Milligan; G. 
M. Dunstan; J. Keifer; J. Bratten; E. Morris; S. Whitlow. 



Felts; 



EASTERN DISTRICT CHAMPIONS 
EASTERN DISTRICT TOURNAMENT 

CHAMPIONS 



136 



P.A. NIPS COX IN 1 5th, FOR DISTRICT TITLE 





HOMERS PROVE DECISIVE BY LEWIS AND KE LEBER 





victory 




celebration. 





BRATTEN STRIKES OUT NINETEEN 



137 



p. A. FIRST TO WIN TWO BASEBALL CROWNS 




SPOTLIGHT ON CHAMPIONS 




BASEBALL TEAM DEFENDS TITLES 




BASEBALL TEAM 1968: Kneeling, left to right: Ray Strickland, Bobby Carpenter, John Kiefer, Mag., Jimmy Johnson. Third Row: Mike Mc- 
Saul, Mickey Byrd, Wayne Courtney. Bill Simmons, Bobby Lewis. Second Cully, Robert German, Ken Deaton, Lewis Welsh, John Beeler, Sam 
Row: Coach VanBenSchoten, Grag Bishop, Bill Estes, Don Ward, Pete Gettle, Travis Blake, Skeeter Whitlow. 




Ray Strickland, Bobby Lewis and John Kiefer, returning lettermen, get some instructions from Coach VanBenSchoten. 



140 



CROSS COUNTRY DISTRICT CHAMPIONS 




THE 1967 CROSS COUNTRY TEAM: First Row, left to right: Tony West, Fred Akers, Robert Dodds. Second Row, left to 
right: Glen Logan, Tim Spruill, Scott Deemer, Darryl Keane, Tommy Salch. 




Darryl paces the team during prictice. 




142 



1967-68 INDOOR TRACK 




INDOOR TRACK TEAM: First Row, left to right: C. Shoemaker, C. 
Samples, T. West, S. Cenderelli, F. Akers, M. Smith, P. Lanteigne. Second 
Row: A. Van Sykes, E. Rucka, A. Want, L. Schriever, D. Haxter, R. Haxter, 



J. Hester, S. Snyder, R. McCollough, J. Mattson. Third Row: R. Jones, G. 
Logan, D. Knapp, P. Green, B. Harrell, F. Tliomas, G. Oxx, D. Keane, B. 
Evans, M. Wilhams, Coach, Dennis Haglan. 



PRINCESS ANNE CAPTURES VA. 




Co-Captains Wilkins and Delacruz receive team awaid. 



THE 1967 TRACK TEAM: KneeUng, Left to Right: R. Haxter, F. Delacruz, M. Jones, 
S. Wilkins. G. Logan, T. West. Standing, Left to Right: C. Shea, D. Keane, B. Felchner, R. 




Tony West begins the mile for P.A. 




Delacruz takes first place in the 220. 

Ronnie Haxter 



144 



BEACH CHAMPIONSHIP 




GOLF 1968 




THE 1968 GOLF TEAM: Left to Right: Coach Pete Sachon, Rick 
Hendren, Joiin Hugiies, Richard Crowther, Paul Ziegler, Bill Draper. 



GYMNASTICS 



1967-68 




Mr. Sachon explains some fine points about golf to his team. 





GYMNASTICS 1968: First row, Left to Right: D. Little, K. Gainor, P. 
McClenny, D. Fisk, P. Mosher. Second Row: C. Howell, M. White, D. 
Baer, A. Sutton, D. Canaday, L. Hartman, G. Collins. 





Libby Nobles 



Libby Hartman 

Polly McClenn 




Libby Nobles 




P.A. BEGINS VARSITY HOCKEY 




Co-Captains: Judy Hendren and Marcia Raynes. Judy and Marcia with sponsors Mrs. French and Miss 

Burkhart. 



147 



J.V. FOOTBALL 




First Row. Left to Right: J. Keller, D. Maxwell, D. Allen, F. Marshall, 
C. Evans, J. Daglow, L. McNeil, P. Carr. Second Row: J. Clancy, F. 
^ggvej^ J. Oxx, J. Mazullo, M. Newbern, G. Olsen, J. Ahlas, J. Nance, 
R. Roenoker. Third Row: J. Matson, R. Jones, F. Hester, B. Paulson, 



D. Haxter, P. Hurd, K. Ahlas, D. Shular, R. WaUs. Fourth Row: 
Coach VanBeschoten, Mgr., M. Bagley, J. Creig, B. Patterson, E. 
Deal, J. Perkins, W. Wright, R. Haines, Mgr.. J. Williaip^s- 





Co-Captains 



148 




149 



JUNIOR CA VALIERS FINISH SEASON 




THE 1968 JUNIOR CAVALIERS: first row, left to right: Ray Ashe, Eddie Diehl, Paul Davis, Jay Williams, Gary Treakle, Mike Fields, Robert Pat- 
terson, second row: Ricky Michaelson, Gary Downs, Jerry Alley, Rudy Tucker, Don Maskall, Ronnie Walls, Coach Phil Williams. 




TRI-CAPTAINS: Rudy Tucker, Don Maskall, Paul 

Davis and Coach Williams. Coach Williams gives hurried instructions to the five starters 

during a timeout. 



150 



WITH U-5 RECORD 




BOYS' AND GIRLS' ST A TE 




BOYS' AND GIRLS' STATE: kneeling, left to right: Guy Taylor, Elwood Gray; second row: Linwood Perry, Nancy 
Harris, Martha Chevalier, Andrea Benda, Barbara Byrtus; last row: Bob German, Jesse Woods. 



Each summer the Junior Class sends representatives to Boys' and Girls' State, each a week-long conven- 
tion of outstanding high school senior students from the state. This activity is sponsored by the American 
Legion of the state of Virginia. Judged on the basis of citizenship, leadership and scholarship, the students 
are recommended by the teachers from which the fellow students vote to decide upon five girls and five 
boys to represent Princess Anne. 

Outstanding seniors from all parts of the state assemble to participate in the mock government of 
various imaginary cities. This was accomplished by electing each of the students at Boys' and Girls' State to 
a position in his city. Boys flocked to William and Mary for the event while Girls' State was held at Rad- 
ford College. The experience gained at Boys' and Girls' State is an invaluable asset to these students as they 
prepare to become the citizens of tomorrow and face its new challenges. 



154 



HI-Q TEAM 1968 




HI-Q TEAM 1968: left to right: Lem Marshall, Tom Cooper, Bill Heath, Terry Brenneman, Diane O'Rourke, 
Jeff Jewett. 



Princess Anne was honored this year as being chosen to participate in Hi-Q, the high school quiz show 
based on College Bowl. Terry Brenneman, Tom Cooper, Jeff Jewett (captain) and Lem Marshall were the 
team members, with Diane O'Rourke and Bill Heath as alternates. Under the excellent coaching of Mr. E. E. 
Cox and Miss McCullum, the team was thrice victorious; thus they earned the chance to compete in the 
championship play-off in early June. 

January 14, P. A.'s Hi-Q team stomped Hampton 335 to 60 and overtook Wilson and Norfolk Catholic 
in the next two matches with scores of 325 to 90 and 285 to 65, respectively. 



155 



JUNIORS OVERTHROW SENIORS 



All year long there is a constant struggle between 
the Juniors and the Seniors in many fields of en- 
deavor, and the Powder Puff game is certainly to their 
prestige. However, after two years of victory enjoyed 
by the Seniors, their record was upset by the Juniors 
in a final score of 14—7. The Junior victory had been 
foreshadowed by their winning of the scrimmage 
game. 

In order to make this event possible, the Junior 
girls under the direction of Mr. Pursell and the Sen- 
iors under the direction of Mr. Brown put in many 
long, hard hours of practice. The Powder Puff game 
is sponsored by the G.A.A. 

Alpha- Y-Teens started a new trend last year in se- 
lecting a Powder Puff King. The king is selected by 
penny votes the preceding week and crowned at half 
time. This year's Powder Puff King was Bruce 
Runyan. 




THE SENIORS 




Coach Pursell gives instructions to one of his Junior girls. 




156 



IN POWDER PUFF GAME 




The King, Bruce Runyan receives his kiss from Vivian McGanty and then his crown. 

157 



HONOR GRADUATES 





The Class of 1968 produces two outstanding seniors, Jeff Jewett and 
Lem Marshall, as valedictorian and salutatorian. As well as maintaining 
a high scholastic average, these two participate in many extracurricular 
activities. 

Jeff, valedictorian, is president of the Chess Club and Electronics 
Club and vice-president of the National Honor Society. Also he is an ac- 
tive member of Key Club, reporter, photographer for the PAGE Staff 
and artist for the FOLIO Staff. However, there is more. Jeff serves as a 
S.C.A. representative, artist for S.C.A. publicity committee and I.C.C. 
representative. National Merit Scholarship Finalist and National Honor 
Society Scholarship Semi-finalist are among his honors. His interests are 
art and parties. 

Lem, salutatorian, also keeps pace with a busy schedule. He is presi- 
dent of Jr. Civitans and the Band Council and vice-president of the 
Chess Club. Lem is also the student band conductor. Last but not 
least, he is a member of the S.C.A. Executive Committee and Foreign 
Exchange Committee and the tennis team. Not lacking in honors, Lem 
received a letter of commendation on National Merit Exam and was 
runner-up for State of Virginia in National Council of Teachers of En- 
glish exams. He is a seven time member of the P. A. Scholastic Team 
and F.A.'s representative on the all Tidewater Team. Lem is also a fina- 
list in the DuPont Scholarship competition. He was elected to go to 
Boy's State, and he also went to Brazil as one of P.A.'s foreign ex- 
change students. 




Maiy Brinkley Bonnie Burbage Barbara Byrtus Linda Cartwiight Martha Chevalier 



158 










Elizabeth Fuqua Maria Garcia 




t 






^1 






Bonnie Montgomery Diane O'Rourke Michael Parker 



Oliver Perry 







Barbara Schumert James Smith 



Rose Smith 







Catherine Combs Thomas Cooper Mary Dalton Gaetana DiBerto Thai Do Lien Stephen td wards Patricia I enno 




Elwood Gray Donna Hampton Nancy Harris Marilyn Horstman Donna Ireland 




John Kiefer Linda MacAnanny Mary MacLeod Julia Maskall Georgene Mattson Gary Meredith Susan Miller 




Linda Phillips Mary Polansky Marcia Raynes 




Sondra Steeg Billy Stephenson Marilyn Thompson Cynthia V'iau 



Marsha Wade 



Emily Warren 



Susan White Robert Wooldridge Kathryn Wright 



Jeanie Wright 



NOT PICTURED: Dale Lee 

Jesse Woods 



159 



SCHOLASTIC TEAMS 1967-68 




As 



FIRST SEMESTER SCHOLASTIC TEAM: seated, left to right: 

Parsons, Jeff Jevvett, Jerry MiUer, Robert Patterson. 

Each semester the faculty selects eight students, 
two from class, as a member of the Princess Anne 
High School Scholastic Achievement Team. Major 
considerations when choosing team members include 
the grades a student makes, the courses he is taking, 
and his character. 

In addition to selecting a school team, the faculty 



Michelle Clifton, Lem Marshall, Cheryl Rudd. standing: Donald 

names one of the senior members to the AU- Tidewat- 
er Scholastic Achievement Team. This senior com- 
petes with other outstanding Scholastic Team mem- 
bers for a scholarship of two thousand dollars, which 
is presented by the LEDGER STAR, the sponsor of 
the scholastic team program. 




SECOND SEMESTER SCHOLASTIC TEAM: left to right: Michelle Clifton, Lori Hurdis, Jerry Miller, Jeff Jewett, Lem Mar- 
shall, Douglas Pilley, Don Parsons. 



HONOR COURT BUILDS CHARACTER AND PROMOTES 




HONESTY 



HONOR COURT: seated, left to right: Barbie Byrtus, Rosi Cadorette, Marcia Raynes, Patty Rudd, 
Donna Mohn. standing: Chris Trapp, Mike Oberholtzer, Joel Miller, David Parsons. 



Building strong moral character is the purpose of the Honor 
Court. The Court accomplished this by promoting honesty at 
Princess Anne. Under the direction of Mrs. Phillips and Mrs. 
MacLean, the Court tries cases which are brought before it. 
They recommend punishment, but the Assistant Principal makes 
the final decision. It is not a club that meets to ostracize stu- 
dents; the judges do not roam the halls expecting to catch stu- 
dents violating regulations. The Honor Court is only interested 
in producing better citizens for the world. 

It is the responsibiUty of every student to uphold outstand- 
ing reputation and Honor Code: 

I pledge on my honor. 

To conduct myself to uphold the honor of my school 
To report myself for cheating 
To report myself for stealing 

To report myself for damaging or destroying public or pri- 
vate property 

To report myself for violating school rules and regulations, 
and. 

To report others who do not uphold this pledge. 



1967-1968 




161 



I 



NA VAL JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING 





CAPTAIN CATON: Head of the NJROTC. 




Drill, drill and more drill. 



The Naval Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
was established this year at Princess Anne by the Secre- 
tary of the Navy. This school is one of fifteen in the 
nation to have this program and the second in the state 
of Virginia. The program was enacted by congress to 
present to a select group of young men the opportun- 
ity to embark on an interesting and rewarding experi- 
ence as Naval Cadets. 

It emphasizes physical fitness, orderly appearance, 
respectful conduct and individual responsibility in ad- 
dition to classroom material. This program's goal is to 
develop informed young men with a strong sense of 
self-reliance, personal knowledge of the responsibilities 
of citizenship and appreciation of the Navy's national 
defense role. 

The three course covers the rudimentary back- 
ground sciences used in the daily pursuit of naval oper- 
ations such as oceanography, meteorology, navigation, 
electronics, astronomy and other associated practical 
subjects. The cadets also drill, fire weapons on the 
range, obtain an understanding of safety precautions 
in handling small arms and a general knowledge of 
weapomy. They also have the opportunity to view na- 
val demonstrations in fire fighting, amphibious tactics, 
and assaults. They conduct and become aware of tradi- 
tional ceremonies. 

The development of leadership and the importance 
of teamwork are stressed, while high standards of per- 
sonal conduct and self-reliance are expected from the 
cadets who are enrolled in the program. 

NJROTC will provide valuable preparation for stu- 
dents interested in the Naval Academy. The certificate 
of completion awarded for successful completion of 
three years entitles one year of college level ROTC to 
be waived. The man who volunteers for active duty af- 
ter high school may recieve waivers from basic techni- 
cal training and be assigned early to advanced training. 
Joining NJROTC does not obligate the student to the 
mihtary for later service. 



CHIEF HEPLER 




Captain Caton giving a lecture on Naval 
history. 




Weapons are also a part 
of NJROTC. 





FIRST PLATOON NJROTC: first row, left to right: D. Hewitt, R. Ker- MiUer, R. Farnham, R. Conken, D. Case. FIRST PLATOON COMMAND- 
scy, G. BaiJcy, J. Smith, R. Liskovee. second row, left to right: R. Mills, ER, Don Sims. OPERATION OFFICER, Joseph Eharmen. 
J. Eharmen, A. Arncsen, G. Alhcs, S. Gibbs. third row, left to right: J. 




164 




THIRD PLATOON NJROTC: kneeling, left to right: A. Wcast, M. Garrett, S. Hawlcy, 1'. Carr, S. Wliitc, S. Whit- 

Doloresco, B. Hathaway, first row standing, left to right: low, P. Finch, M. Mdntyre. CORP COMMANDER: Art 

J. CaUan, B. Scanlon, W. Bailey, B. Kaplan, M. Ennis. Doloresco. THIRD PLATOON COMMANDER, BiU Hath- 

third row standing, left to right: S. Brown, G. Olsen, L. away. 




FOURTH PLATOON NJROTC: first row, left to right: Mott, D. Schmidt, J. Curling, H. Liverman, S. White, R. 

D. Ward, B. Freeman, M. Schimmel, D. Benjamin, E. Michaelsen, D. Midgette, C. Trapp, F. Wallace, D. KelJy, 

Blackmerc, D. Samples, second row: J. Hansley. C. Cham- M. Combs. EXECUTIVE OFFICER: Don Ward. COM- 

paign, B. Gaskins, B. Uhl, M. Dunn, third row: W. Dc- MUNICATIONS OFFICER: David Samples. 



165 



SENIORS 




SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS AND SPONSOR: left to right: Sponsor, Mrs. Mary Barnes; President, John Kiefer* Treasurer, 
Donna Ireland; Secretary, Martha Chevalier, Vice-President, Tom Counter. 



SENIORS 

As a student reaches the pinnacle of his high school career, 
his senior year, he looks behind and ahead with mixed emo- 
tions. However, there is nothing quite like the status of a sen- 
ior. It is a position of utmost assurance one moment, and nag- 
ging worries about the future the next. Seniors are constantly 
in a swarm of activities. No one will ever forget the excruciat- 
ing efforts to finish the dread term papers, or the relief that 
accompanied their completion. There are the vivid memories 
of athletic events and the haunting nightmares of chocolate 
candy bars that will forever be a part of Princess Anne's alum- 
ni. The profits from the candy sale event for the prom, scholar- 
ships for deserving seniors and to provide its alma mater with a 
nice gift. 

As the year drew to a close. Seniors were in a frenzy to 
complete last minute preparations. With the passing of the 
Prom went some of the anxiety that had accompanied once 
unsolved problems. Members of the Class of 1968 will always 
cherish the reverent simplicity of the Baccalaureate service and 
the solemn grandeur of commencement. These exercises mark- 
ed the end of a high school career filled with fun, work, and 
memories memones of the GREAT CLASS of '68. 



166 



CLASS OF '68 





168 



CLASS OF '68 




Priscilla Bradford Martha Bradshaw Deborah Brenneman Terry Brenneman Mike Brewer 




Scottie Brown Linda Bryant Larry Bullock Elizabeth Bungard Bonnie Burbage 




Suzie Burcham Betty Bush George Byers Peggy Byers Barbara Byrtus 



169 



CLASS OF '68 







v 



Barbara Byrd James Caldwell Kathy Campbell 



Bob Cande 




Cheryl Cannon 




Nancy Garden Marie Cadorette Barbara Carlin 



Mark Carper Bruce Carpenter 




Christine Carr 







Patrick Carr Patricia Carter Rebecca Carter Linda Cartwright 






Wayne Caudill Warren Cavey Michael Cespedes Joe Chapman John L. Chapman 



170 



CLA SS OF '68 




Barry Cheatham Martha Chevalier Terri Chishoim Trudy Chowns Kathryn Chuilli 




Janice Clifton Beverly Cobb Catherine Combs Sherry Conley Nanct Cooper ♦ 




Tom Cooper TUson Copeland Leslie Copeland Walter Corliss David Couch 




Thomas Counter Cheryl Cowell Robert Cox Mary Craver Wendy Cronin 



171 



CLASS OF '68 




172 



CLASS OF '68 




CLA SS OF '68 




Ann Fuqua Kay Gable Maria Garcia Larry Garret Linda Garrity 




David George Cindy Gerlock Robert German Steve GibsoMft Diane Goddin 




Kathy Golden Grouse Gray Paul Green Sally Greningr Nancy Grimes 




Hiram Guerra Jeanne Hackney Ralph Haddock Donna Hampton Pam Hancock 



174 



CLA SS OF '68 




Sandi Harrness Janet Harnagel Dann Harris Deborah Harris ^fiusty Harris 




Bill Hathaway Janies Hatstat Ronald Haxter Patricia Haywood Bill Heath 




Helen Henderson Rick Hendren Judy Hendron Chuck Herndon John Hicks 

175 



CLASS OF '68 




Frank Hightower Linda Hill Terry Hill Gayle Hitchcock Terry Hogan 




Ken Halloman MarUyn Horstman Linda Howard Brenda Howett Wynette Hudgins 




Dianne Hunter Ellen Hunter Suzanne Hunter Lelia Ingle Martin Ingram 




Mark Ingram Donna Ireland Garland Isdell Robert James David Jensen 



176 



CLASS OF '68 




Arlene Jones Gary Jones Winston Jones Earl Jordan Bill Jordan 




Ronald Kappers Darryl Keane Arlene Kelley Linda Kelley Koleen Kelly 




Lynne Kelly Michael Kelly Kathleen Kennedy Diane Kennedy Lynne Kerslake 



177 



CLASS OF '68 





John Kiefer 



Jo Kight 



Don Kigeri Sandra Kiser Patricia Kohler 




John Kona Stephen Kona Debbie Kowalske Gerri Kraemer James Krone 






Barb Kubiszewski Don Lane Mike Lavee Mary Lawrence Connie Leary 




Diana Lentz Robert Lewis Shelly Loofbourrow Linda Lopez Ed Love 



178 



CLASS OF '68 




Diane Lucas Lydia Luna Linda MacAnanny Mallye MacLeod Dennis Magyorosi 




Billy Maurice Thomas Maxwell Michael May Jim McAuslan Brenda McCormick 



179 



CLASS OF '68 





Donna McCullough Pat McGee Richard McGinnis Jeff McKain Jane McKown 




Steve McMichael Linda McManus Rita McNuity Kevin Meek Helen Menge 




Gary Meredith Sandra Merritt Priscilla Midgette William Miles Susan MUes 





Conan Miller Don Miller Jacqueline Miller Marian Miller Nancy MUler 



180 




181 



CLASS OF '68 




Peggy Pasch all Maureen Patterson Earl Perry* Linwood Perry William Perry 




Susan Perry Eileen Persinger Mike Phelps Linda Phillip* Leslie Pickering 




182 



CLASS OF '68 




Frank Schuler Barbara Schubert Ann Schwemley Evonne Scott Bernard Seagle 




Jimmy Seegers Guy Shaw Linda Sherman Freddy Simpson Lloyd Slade 



184 




Janet Smiley Barbara Smith Carolyn Smith Jim Smith Rose Ann Smith 









Sharon Smith Linda Sokoi Jack Spence Bob Spencer Garland Speight 




tVilliam Stancih^ Bette Stancil Ginni Stanley Rita Steadman Sandra Steeg 




Earl Stephenson Billy Stephenson Jackie Stephens Edward Stilwell Dale Stocks 



185 



CLASS OF '68 




\ 





Bonnie Stone Michael Stoneham Merry Strawser Ray Strickland 



Cheryl Strom 




1/ 




Wayne Stublen 



Randy Sutton Carol Swanner 



Pat Sykes 



Bobby Sykes 





Richard Talbert 



Guy Taylor 



Kay Taylor 



Winnie Taylor 



Michael Teets 





Kurt Teller Elizabeth Templeton Charles Thorp 



Donna Thomas 



Fred Thomas 



186 



CLA SS OF '68 




Glenn Thomas Linda Thomas Richard Thomas Bill Thomas Marilyn Thompsdit 




Larry Thurston Steve Tignor Marsha Trauthwein Carl Turiey Sherry Turley 




Patricia Ulrich PamUa Uhl Elaine Vann Leslie Verner Pat Vesci 




Debbie Via Cindy Viau Marsha Wade James Walker James F. Walker 



187 



CLASS OF '68 




CLASS OF '68 




Fay Wilson Judith Witzl Janet Wood Linda Woods Jesse Woods 




lljjpjjjjjpi' 




Robert Woolridge Harold Wright Kathy Wright Norma Wright Bobby Wright 




Billy Yarbrough Judith Yates Grace Yoder Jerry Young 



Lisa Young 




Barbara Youngblood Ann Zirpoli Jan Zimmerman Katherine Zimmer Paul Zieitlg^ 



189 



JUNIORS 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS AND SPONSOR: left to right: Treasurer, Joe McDaniels; President, Linda Wilkims; Sponsor, Mrs. Doro- 
thy Jones; Vice-President, Buddy McGinfV; Secretary, Helen Spence. 



JUNIORS 

With sighs of relief, Juniors have mounted another step in their 
chmb to maturity and look forward with eager anticipation. They stand 
a little straighter and walk with the self-assurance that the past two 
years of hard work have given them. 

Junior year is filled with many frustrations and lots of planning. 
There is the excitement of ordering rings climaxed by the ring dance — 
as much a part of the junior year as the prom is of the Senior Year. The 
theme selected for their ring dance was Hawaiian. Of course, for the 
next couple of weeks everyone knew who were Juniors. But after all. 
The Senior Ring is a great status symbol. 

The Junior Class also sponsored a Junior night at the basketball game 
with Granby to bring recognition to the Class of 1969. Their close ob«- 
servance of surrounding activities, their acceptance of responsibility 
and the maturity they have attained is necessary to make their senior 
year their best year at Princess Anne. 



190 



JUNIORS 



Russell Adams 
(•red Akers* 

Eugene Alley 
Thomas Altman 
Frieda Amman 



Ronald Andrews 
Rosanne Ange 
Michael Appell 
Adair Archibald 
Clair Archibald 



Virginia Arnaldo 
Rhonda Arthur 
Brian Backus 
Susan Bailey 
Robert Bain 



Thomas Baker 
Jeanine Baldwin 
Cheryl Ballard 

hn Barber 
Mary Barber 



liteve Barlow 

Gary Barnes 
Jan Barnett 
Anita BarnhUl 
Sue Barnhill 



Lenna Jo Bartley 
Jim Basgier 
Marsha Bayles 
Bill Beamon 
Woody Beard 



Dick Beebe 
John Berler 
Geraldine Belch 
Alison Benda 
Ronald Berry 




1 




191 



JUNIORS 










Gary Benson 
Larry Boetcher 
Sylvia Boggs 
Don Bohanan 
Holly Bond 



Anita Booher 
Shirley Bonta 
Russel Bourne 
Gwendolyn Bowdoin 
John Bowles 



Rodney Bowles 
James Bradshaw 
John Brandt 
Dennis Brichell 
Gregory Broerman 



Mary Brown 
Stephen Brown 
Stephen Brown 
Mary Bullock 
Donald Bunn 



Carol Burkett 
Cindy Bush 
Anne Butler 
Mary Butler 
Richard Byrd 



Jack Callan 
Anthony Calp 
Dan Calp 
Linda Campbell 
Frank Cannon 



Eugene Canupp 
Karen Carlson 
Mike Carper 
Cheryl Carrol 
Reginold Carrol 



192 



JUNIORS 



Margaret Carter 
Shirley Cartwright 
Helen Cascell 
Susan Cavender 
Donna Cespedes 



George Chapman 
Dale Charles 
Jennifer Chidester 
David Childress 
Frances Chobot 



Diana Clark 
Donna Clark 
Janet Clark 
Jacqueline Coleman 
Daniel Collins 



Gerald Collins 
Richard Conken 
Wayne Courtney 
Christeen Craig 
Kenneth Crawford 



Creamer Craig 
Leonard Cressman 
Barbara Cross 
Gary Crowther 
Deborah Culberson 



Kathleen Cullen 
Nancy Cullins 
Kenny Curtis 
Steve Dail 
Diane Dalby 



Lynn Davenport 
Patsy Davis 
Paula Davis 
Gary Dayton 
Janet Deatherage 





^^^^^^^W ^^^^^^^B ^^^Bj^^^W 



lill^ fllkl^^ 




193 



JUNIORS 



ri*' ijr 




^IHHH^^HIH^^^H HHHBHHIHHH^I IHHHH^IHHHHI "SH '^'IW '*1HH^^H 

^ f?^ 




tVl m'*"! ^n^f ^"^^ 




Scott Deemer 
Chris De La Cruz 
Dottie Dion 
Lee Dorough 
Steve Doucette 



Debbie Doughtie 
Daniel Dowdy 
Becky Drake 
Kathy Draper 
Shelia Dudley 



Douglas Dugroo 
Anna Duke 
Steve Dunn 
Mike Dunstan 
Kathy Duvall 



Kaye Eatmon 
Sharon Edington 
Sharon Edmonds 
Joseph Ehrmann 
Robert Elhs 



Gail Enroughty 
Bill Estes 
Betty Evans • 
Brenda Evans 
Don Evans 



Kris Evick 
Robert Farmer 
Donald Farmer 
Susan Fay 
Monica Fazio 



Roy Fentress 
Margaret Fenno 
Kathy Fergusion 
Regina Filipowski 
Tom Fisher 



194 



JUNIORS 



Diane Fisher 
David Fisk 
yickie Flanagi 

Rolfe Fleming 
Cathy Fletcher 



Melvin Forehand 
Sandra Forehand 
Don Forbes 
Bill Ford 
Leslie Fortune 



Cheryl Foster 
John Fowler 
Dianne Fox 
Bill Friesz 
Carol Frizzell 



Gaye Frugrd 
Darlene Gallop 
Cathy Garrett 
Mark Garrett 
Wilson Gawthrop 



Linda Geisaka 
Rex Gerard 
Robert Gerloff 
Sam Gettel 
Ronnie Gibbon 



John Gilbert 
Valerie GiUs 
Carol Gilroy 
Terry Gomez 
Luisa Godoy 



Patrick Goodwin 
Karen Garman 
Sandra Graham 
James Grant 
David Greenfield 













195 



JUNIORS 




Camille Greife 
Kathy Griffin 
Lee Grover 
Sharon Grover 
Laurie Grumbach 



Debby Gunter 
Ruth Gurganue 
Greg Haake 
Carol Hale 
Cynthia Hall 



Keith Hallman 
Cam Justice 
Barrie Hamilton 
Rosemary Hamiltoiii 

Danny Hamm 



Jerry Hansley 
Billie Harkness 
Kenny Harper 
William Harrel 

Betty Harris 



Elaine Harris 
Jack Harris 
Jack Harris 
Linda Harris 
Larry Harrison 



Pat Harrison 
Bill Hartlove 
Ronald Haynes 
Cindy Haywood 
Ellen Hazelwood 



Sue Helvestine 
Lou Hepler 
Jim Hereford 
Alice Hewitt 
Beth Hickey 



196 



Diane Hickman 
Linda Hill 
Shelby Hill 
Tim HUl 
Karen Hodges 



Paul Hoffman 
Rheva Holt 
Jack Horton 
Phyllis Horton 
Susan Horton 



Randy Houpt 
Lathan Howard 
Nanette Howard 
Bill Howie 
Linda Hudson 



Lamar Hulett 
Robert Hurst 
John Imbert 
Gayle Ingram 
Bill Jackson 



Jerry Jacquin 
Curtis Johansen 
Mike Johnson 
Kathie Johnson 
Ronald Johnson 



David Jones 
Francine Jones 
Kim Jones 
Mike Jones 
Becky Jones 



Rodney Jones 
Karen Jones 

Sandra Hardison 
Theresia Keech 
Don Kelly 



JUNIORS 








^^^^^ 

















197 



JUNIORS 











*^ pip 
































. 11 


^^^^^ ^^p^ 



Jim Kelly 
Lynette Kelly 
Patrick Kennedy 
Ron Kersey 



John Kingsley 
Doug Knack 
Julie Knick 
Michaline Kohn 
Brenda Krahenbill 



Paul Krynski 
Kathy Kuzminski 
Warren Lambert 
Charles Lanfranchi 
Barbara Law 



Steve Ledermann 
Frank Lemand 
Kris Lips 

Barbara Litchfield 
Glen Logan 



John Long 
Diana Loofbourrow 
John Lucus 
Marie Lumpkins 
Roger Lundy 



Reggie Lynch 
Chuck Maddux < 
Larry Mahaffey^ ■ 
Pam Manning 
Sandra Marchione 



Mark Marchbank 
Cliff Marinilli 
Johnathan Marson 
Diane Marshall^ 

Dick Marshall 



198 



JUNIORS 



Kathy Matthews 
Kathy Mays 
Mario Mazzei 
Robert McBurney 
Irvin McClenny 



Polly McClenny 
Peggy McCord 
Joe McCoy 
Robert McCuUough 
Mike McCully 



Joe McDaniels 
Kay McEvoy 
Vivian McGanty 
Buddy McGinty 

Ron McHenry 



Leonard McKay 
Wayne McKenzie 
Chris McKinney 
Doris McNew 
Donna Meadow 



Gail Mears 
Jackie Melfa 
Teri Meredith 
Esther Metts 
Deborah Midgett 



Judy Midget 
Tommy Midgette 
Donald Midgette 
Jerry Miller 
Judy Millhouse 



Robert Mills 
Donna Mohn 
Eric Montgomery 
Jay Moone 
Lynn Moore 













199 



JUNIORS 





^1 ''''^^''y^^^l^B^^^B 



p 




1^2^ -V ^^^^ 






Susan Moorehead 
Barbara Moran 
Dennis Morgan 
Carol Morgan 
Jo Dee Morris 



Jane Moss 
Lois Munden 
Stephen Murden 
Arnold Newbern 
Barbara Newman 



Jud Newton 
Trent Nicholas 
Sandra Nichols 
Denise Nickerson 
Robbie Norville 



Roxanne Nunnally 
Mike O'Connell 
Pattie Oehili 
Errol Oiler 
Charles Onspaugh 



Ken Osborne 
Dickie Page 
Eric Parker 
James Parker 
Vickie Patton 



Deidra Patton 
Glenn Payne 
Biff Pearson 
Nancy Permenter 
Bo Perry 



Mike Perucci 
Becky Peterson 
Susan Phillippi 
Billy PhiUips 
Bessie Pierce 



200 



JUNIORS 



Bart Pierce ♦ 

Susan Pilley 
Dana Pillow 
David Plaster 
Lynn Poff 



Laura Pollie 
Robert Poyner 
Bill Prentiss 
Linda Price 
Shelton Price 



Margie Raphael 
Pat Reed 
Laura Register 
Evelyn Rice 
Thomas Rinehart 



Betty Roberts 
Sharon Roe 
JoAnne Rogers 
Sandy Rooks 
Larry Ruminski 



Margene Russel 
Mike Sabin 
George Sallwasser 
David Samples 
Tony Sanders 






Bill Scanlen 
Karen Scarborough 
Doug Scepp 
George Schmitt 
Mark Schuler 



Donna Schultz 
Denise Schulte 
Carole Seagle 
Sharon Self 
Ernie Seiderman 




201 



JUNIORS 




202 



JUNIORS 



Dorothy Stelried 
Terry Stephens 
Dennis Stephenson 
Lynn Stevens 
Susan Stewart 





Virginia Stewart 
Belinda Stublen 
Robert Stubblefield 
Richard Sturtevant 
Doris Suggs 



Richard Summers 
Vivian Sutton 
Howard Sykes 
Maureen Szymanski 
Gladys Tarkenton 



Elizabeth Taylor 
Barbara Taylor 
Margaret Taylor 
Robert Taylor 
Brenda Teller 



Donna Throckmorton 
Joyce Touchton 
Christopher Trapp 
Michael Trask 
Debra Troup 



George Truzillo 
William Turner 
William Ulrich 
Patricia Talbert 
Sheila Van Canagan 



Charles Van Dusen 
Cindy Vann 
Donald Variot 
Jeff Veneable 
Karen Verget 






203 



JUNIORS 









^^^^ 

. V ..IS 




&<f4|||||| 
















^^^^ 
















^ t:. 1 


1^ 



James Vernon 
Daphne Vi* 
Robert Viau 
Wayne Waff 
Eric Walker 



Gordon Walker 
Otis Walkef 

James Wallace 
Sue Walton 



Bobby Watson 
Janice Webb 
Mary WelcU 
Lewis Welck 
Paul West 



Moe Wheeler 
Pat Wheeler 
Fred White 
Sammy White 
Yvonne Whitehead 



Michael Whitley 
Skeeter Whitlow 

Donald Wiam 
Sandy Wier 
Charlotte Wiggins 



Linda Wilkins 
Mac Wilhams 
Kathy Williams 
Mitchell Williams 
Kyle Williams 



Sheryl Williams 
Arlene Williamson 
Gary Wilson 
George Wilson 
Thomas Wilson 



204 



JUNIORS 




205 



SOPHOMORES 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS AND SPONSOR: Left to Right: President, Barbara Snyder; Vice-Pre: 
dent, Cindy Snyder; Sponsor, Mr. Ken Cauthen; Secretary, Julie Lindsay; Treasurer, Donna Sturtevant. 



SOPHOMORES 
A culmination of students from many area schools, the 
class of 1970 has been combined with lots of students from 
diversified backgrounds who can pool their interests and come 
up with some fresh, new ideas. Having somewhat overcome 
their lack of security and confidence in their freshman year, 
the sophomores establish themselves a little more firmly as 
high-schoolers. 

The annual Sophomore Dance remained the most impor- 
tant event of the sophomore year. The dance was held in the 
spring and was the result of long hours of work, frustration, 
and more work in an attempt to make it a dance unlike any 
other at Princess Anne. 

Two years of hardwork and study lie ahead of the members 
of the class of 1970 and what they make of this year and the 
next will determine the success of their graduating class. 



206 



SOPHOMORES 



Teresa Abatello 
Michael Abraham 
Gaily n Agar 
Gerald Ahles 
Sandia Alexanda- 
David Allen 



Charles Aman 
Nancy Appel 
Arthur Arnesen 
Raymond Arnold 
Raymond Ashe 
Robert Baer 



Mark Bahley 
Debra Bailer 
Lynne Basgier 
Loren Bazinet 
Theresa Beck 
Jack BeU 



Dennis Benjamin 
Raymond Benson 
Steffi Berger 
Eugene Blackmer 
Donna Box 
Bob Boyd 



Michael Bradley 
Richard Brown 
Donna Buchanan 
Mickey Byrd 
^borah Canadajr 
Carolyn Carden 



Susan Cande 
Rochelle Carpenter 
Peter Carr 
Barry Can 
Dennis Case 
Sarah Casey 



Stuart Cenderelli 
Charles Champagne 
Ann Chapman 
Janet Qancy 
Jim Clancy 
Charles Collins 



Melissa Coleman 
Maurice Combs 
Jo Anna Commander 
John Cook 
Lany Cordon 
Daniel Carliss 



207 



SOPHOMORES 





w i^r 

^^^^ ^ tfsk 



V 4.- * 4— 








James Craig - 
Missy Crane 

MiUaid Crank 
Laurie Crawford 
Nancy Creighton 
Gloria Cunniff 



John Curling 
Martha Custer 
Jeannette Daniel 
Donna Daver 
Robert Daughtrey 
DeeCee Davenport 



Nancy Davis 
Paul Davis 
Wesley DeMott 
Connie Diaz 
Bridget Diberto 
Robert Dick 



Donna Dickson 
Gary Downs 
Harold Draper 
Deborah DriscoU 
Chris Duff 
Barbara Dunn 



Mike Eberhardt 
Jane Edwards 
Bill Eisenberg 
RoMklEUiS 
Karen Emery 
Mike Ennis 



Raymond Famham 
Susan Fiery 
Paul Finch 
Debbie Fisk 
Hob PletehA 
Teresa Fox 



Bill Foy 

Robert Freeman 
lU«liyG«noi* 

Mike Gallond 
Phil Gamble 
Cathy Anne Ganoe 



Linda Garris 
Millie Garrity 
Steve Kenneday 
Alfreda Kemper 
Rosemary Kelly 
John Keller 



208 



Nick Gibbs 
Joe Gibson 
PhyUis GUes 
Diana Goad 
iaan GosseU 
Sandra Graves 



Sharon Gregory 
Maisie Gregory 
Patricia Griffin 
Sharon Gross 
Thomas Gundersen 
Richard Gurganus 



Thomas Hagei 
Joseph Halapin 
Deborah Hardy 
David Harper 
Brenda Harrell 
Betty Harris 



Christine Harris 
Melinda Harris 
Mike Harsh 
Christy Hart 
Lillian Harvey' 
Vera Harvey 



Sherman Hawley 
Divid Baxter 
Steve Henderson. 
Phyllis Hepler 
Fletcher Hestei' 
Linda HiU 



Shirley Hitchcock 
Anne Hoffman 
Roxanne Hogan 
Yvonne Holcomb 
GUbert Holt 
Richard Holt 



Karen Holzhaeuser 
Andrea Hoover 
Darlene Hughes 
Theresa Hughes 
Phil Hurd 
Lori Hurdis 



Serce Ingram 
Kay Jensen 
James Johnson 
Joy Johnson 
Karen Johnson 
Sharon Johnson 
Maxine Joiner 






"7v 

















111 i " 











209 



SOPHOMORES 

^^^^^ ^3^^^^ 








^ ^ ^^"^ 







1 



Eteborah Jones 
EiUen Jordan 
Brad Kaplan 
Norman Kam 
Kathy Kear 
Barbara Keef 



Sharon Kennedy 
Connie Kerns 



DaYjd Kingsb ury 



BiU Kloc 
Marsha Kurs 



Debbie Lanthier 
Darcy Lau^ton 
Rosemarie Lavoie 
Dan Lazar 
Donna Lee 
Brenda Lehr 



Peggy Levitt 
Hank Lewis 
Julie Lindsay 
Rudy Liskovec 
Deleslie Little 
H. C. Liverman 



Cheryl Logan 
Terry Longanecker 
Mildred Lyman 
Michael Macdonald 
John Macleod 
Elizabeth Macon 



Pamela Magger 
Emory Majors 
William Marchant 
Patricia Marino 
Frank Marshall 
Mark Martin 



Nancy Martin 
William Martin 
Linda Marinelli 
VMiltnMaskaU 

Sheila Massey 
David Maxwell 



John Mazzullo 
Deborah McClintock 
James McDaniel 
Wilbur McDonald 
Lynn McGee 
Linda McJunkin 
Alex McNeill 



210 



Terry Merritt 
Ricky Michaelsen 

Cynthia Midgette 
Pat Middleton 
Sandra Miley 
Robert Miles 



Debby Miller 
Joel Miller 
tftonny Millet 

Roxanne Miller 
Margaret Milligan 
Linda Molodovitch 



Kathy Moore 
Scott Moore 
Vickey Moore 
Neda Morris 
Michaelle Mosher 
Norma Nasis 



Mike Newbem 
Pat Northcraft 
Steve Oberholtzer 
Greg Olson 
David Oshel 
Don Parsons 



Robert Patterson 
#laiiy Paul< 

Chris Peedin 
Richard Perkins 
Connie Petrie 
David Pfitzer 



Judy Phillips 
Barry Pickering 
Jenifer Pickens 
Ramon Pimentel 
Charles PineU 
iKaren Pomeroy* 



Lenora Powell 
Nancy Pugh 
Sandy Ransone 
Kathy Ragsdale 
Melanie Retzke 
Vtanr RiggA 



Marsh Rightmier 
Connie Roberts 
Mary Roberts 
Steven Robinett 
Jerry Robinson 
Richard Rowe 



SUFHOMORES 




A ^ <^ 







211 



SOPHOMORES 







1 



^"^"^^ 

2^ ^ ^ Mi ^ ^ 



Becky Rowland 
John Royall 
Danny Rudy 
Vicki Rushing 
Debbie Sakil 
Tommy Salch 



Call Saliba 

Ruth Anne Slazbeig 

Ross Sands 

9attSapp 

Louis Schachther 
Mike Schimmel 



Gale Schmalz 
Tim Schmalz 
David Schmidt 
Pat Schuier 
Melissa Shelton 
Connie Shoits 



DividShuIrt 

Maicia Silliphant 
Glinn Simmons 
Linda Smith 
Meve Smith 

Baibaia Snyder 



Cindy Snyder 

Linda Snyder 
Wendy Snyder 
Pat Sorey 
Debra Stancil 
Carol Star key 



Joyce Stephenson 
Bill Stier 
Bill Stroud 
Debbie Strout 
Donna Sturtevaift 
! Sutton 



Robert Taylor 
Jennie Thomas 
Pat Thomas 
Teresa Thomason 
Gail Thompson 
Jane Tietjen 



Debbie Toy 
Gary Treakle 
Terence Turner 
James Tusing 
Charles Uhl 
Paul Van Auken 



212 



SOPHOMORES 




213 



FRESHMEN 




FRESHMEN CLASS OFFICERS AND SPONSOR: Left to right: Vice-President, Maria ClarR; Secretary, William Georg* Spon- 
sor, Mrs. Logan; President, Pete Cavep; Treasurer, Cathy Menitt. 



FRESHMEN 

Finally they were here at Princess Anne High School; part of their 
dream had come true. However, there was the prevalent problem of 
adjusting to the complexity and confusion of Princess Anne. There 
were the huge special assemblies and smooth workings of the student 
government, the mob scenes in the halls as students progress from one 
class to the next, the pencil-chewing tension of three long days of 
exams, and the contagious enthusiasm of the pep rallies and games. 
A combination of these events made the new freshmen realize that 
Princess Anne was their high school and they were a vital part of its 
existence. 

As it was their first year in a large and bustling high school, the 
freshmen did not involve themselves in many extra-curricular activ- 
ities in order to allow enough time for studying and the adjustment 
to high school. However, they did sponsor a dance to bring the 
members of the class of 1971 together as a class. 



214 



FRESHMEN 



Keith Algood 
Carol Alien 
Kim Allen 
Jeiiy AUe]> 

Tim Aimer 
Duanne Ammann 
Howard Anderson 
Merry Anderson 



TEL 



11 



David Bailey 
Debbie Bailey 
Harry Banmaii 
Angie Baker 
Lynn Barker 
Joyce Barker 
Thomas Barnes 
Brenda Barton 



'Jan Banner 
Patncia Bennei; 

John Bennett 
Roger Bissonnett 
Dale Bittner 
Linda Blackburn 
Diana Blackmer 
Denise Blackmer 





Cheryl Brown 
•James Buchanan 
Gary Burcham 
vMelvaBush t 
Christine Carney 
Karen Carper 
Vicki Carter • 
Maurice Casey 




«Michele Clifton* 

Peggy Coates 
Vicki Cochran 
Francis Cole 
Theresa Coleman 
oGaye CoUins 
Jeanette Constantine 
Karen Copley 




Pamelia Blankenship 
Cynthia Boles 
Andrew Brady 
Beth Bratton 
Lorraine Bright 
Randall Brittain 
Cynthia Broerman 
Marvin Bionson 





Renee Casper 
Edward Cavey 
Marian Chapelle 
Nancy Chevaliel 
Larry Childress 
Lynn Chuilli 
Barbara Clark 
Maria Claife 




iv» j^-^ 





Bruce Corbett 
Peter Cometta 
Michael Craig 
Kathleen Craig 
Perry Creighton 
Sharon Crimmel 
Donna Cristelli 
Joyce Cyrus 



215 



FRESHMEN 



Dairell Daniel 
Horace Davis 
Peggy Davis 
Richard Davis 
Gregory Dayton 
James De Fir 
Jerald Deglow 





Christine Dickerson 
Eddie Diehl 
Marsha Dilkes 
Augustus Downing 
Beverly Downs 
Cheryl Doyle 
Thomas Duggan 
Harold Dunbar 



Timothy Duvall 
Emily Eason 
Cathy Edwards 
Sharon Edwards 
Martha Ellison 
^•obert EvAs 
Barbara Fahey 
Laura Faulkenbeny 




Mike Fields 
Dannie Felton 
Chris Fenno 
Barbara Fisk 
Arthur Flowers 
Jackie Foster 
Lewis Foster 
Fowled 




Kathy Franklin 

Gary Freiburgen 
Linda Funderburk 
Debbie Gainor 
Kathy Gallagher 
Steve Gam bill 
Cath 





'"Kenneth Godley 
vHobeit Goff 

Lmda Golden 
Patricia Goodman 
Richard Grant 
James Gregory 
Robert Gregory 
Cynthia Giiffith. 




^ ^ 



wBMGeoig* 

Kenny Gibbon 
Steve Gibbs 
AMcGiUii 
Bemadette Gilroy 
Monica Giordano 
Andiew Clism 
Pamela Goddin 




Virginia Hayes 
David Hendricks 
James Hester 
Christine Hetzer 
HMmbod Hewetf 
Kenny Hillbum 
Kathy HiU 
Trena Hill 



Joanne Hackney 
David Hager 
Robert HainCs 

Clifton Hall 
David Hamilton 
Mark HarreU 
Larry Harris 
Richard Harris 





Chris Holcomb 
Brenda Holcomb 
Jack Holland 
Robyn Holt 
Jo Ann Horton 
Debbie Howe 
C— lAuii HoweU* 
Leslie Howie 



216 



FRESHMEN 



Kathy Hughes 



Jeanne Ireland 
Pam Ireland 
Donna Irwin 
Steve Jackson 
Vanessa James 
Christine Jarvis 





Mike Johnson 
Mike Jennings 
Bruce Johnson 
Jim Johnson 
Tony Johnston 

Qady Jonei* 

Debbie Jones 
Glen Jones 




Catherine Miller 
Gloria Miller 
Jacob Miller 
Katherine Miller 
Rebecca Miller 
Eva Millirons 
Pat Mintz 
Maic Mirman 



217 



FRESHMEN 



William Moon 
Donald Moorehead 
Robert Moran 
Susan Morrison 
Russell Morrison 
Betsy Morrison 
Vicky Morris 
Patrice Moshet 









Don Mulcaie 
Constance 
John Nicholaou 
Ohristine Nixon 
Steven Nixon 
Rodney Oshel 
James O'Rourke 
Sharon Oxx 



Christine Oenbrink 
Diane O'Connell 
Patty O'Brien 
GeoffeOxx ' 
Robbian Pace 
Mmda Paii 
Debbie Paschang 
Suzanne Pate 






Deborah Poyner 

Laveme Poynter 
Pamela Prentiss 

Joni Price 
Linda Price 
Wayne Priest 
Phillip Proctor 
Richard Racine 



il 




Ed Rucka 
Patty Rudd 
Mary Russo 
Charles Samples 
Carol Saunders 
Glenn Schaible 
Lloyd Schriever 
Paul SchuJte 




Ralph She rill 
Medford Shoemaker 
Karen Shorter 
David Sifen 
Beverly Skinner 
Carolyn Smith 
Carolyn Smith 
Eileen Sm'th 






I» ft 





Jeffrey Reyn 
Merle Rice 
David Riggs 
Chiis Robinsofi 
Norma Robinson 
Kyk Rogers' 
Nancy Rogers 
Billy Roper 




Debbie Scott 
Gerald Scott 
Patrick Scott 
Rick Sewell 
Pat Shackelford 
Charles Shaffer 
'PMShaU(^^. 
Bruce Shaw 




John Smiih 
Paula Smith 
Ray Smith 
Earl Snow 
Gerald Snyder 
Gail Sousa 
Cindy Spignuoio 
Richard Spargas 



218 



FRESHMEN 




219 



EIGHTH GRADE 




EIGHTH GRADE OFFICERS AND SPONSOR: Left to Right: Secretary, Anne Pillow; Vice-President, Richard Basquier; Sponsor, 
Mrs. Doyle; President, Chuck Brugh; Treasurer, Lisa Nobles. 




8TH GRADE 

Not quite high-schoolers and finding themselves in the 
midst of a bustling high school put the eighth graders at a 
disadvantage at the very start. However, not willing to accept 
the role as the underdog, the members of the Class of 1972 
went right to work to win themselves recognition. And that 
is just what they did. Under the competent guidance of Mrs. 
Doyle, 8th grade sponsor, they conducted a project to provide 
unfortunate families with Thanksgiving baskets for the Thanks- 
giving holidays. They conducted such a fine drive that the 
school received a letter commending their efforts. If the 
members of the Class of 1972 remain steadfast in their 
endeavors, they will prove to be an outstanding class at 
Princess Anne. 



220 



EIGHTH GRADE 



Nancy Alexandec 
David Amar 
Marty Appeison < 

Dickie Ashe 
Lynn Atkins 
David Bailer 



Carol Best 
Karen Bjorkmaia 
Pam Blake 

Sandy Bolianan 
Charles Bolan 
Debbie Bournt; 



Tom Brovvn 
Chuck Brugl 
Norma Bullock 
Clifford Bungard 
John Burieson 
MatcheU CampbeU 



fi>BimaT?OTvellcf 

Matthew Couch 
Michael Cromwell 
Denise CuUen 
Robert Cunningham 

Douglas Deaton 



Mary Abraham 
Yvonne Abraham 
Curtis Adam 
Karen Agar 
itenny Ahles • 
Kathy Ainley 



John Edwards 
Sherrie Elliott 
Terry Elliott 
Valerie Farmer 
Robert Frierson 
Bruce Frve 



m 




Carol Barkley 
Dianne Barrett 
Richard Basgiet 
Jim Batten 
Bobby Beals 
landa Bennett • 




Cindy Bray 
Joby Brichtar 
Barbara Brovvn 
Linda Browtt 
Percell Brown 
iU>nnie Bj own 




Jerry Canaday 

Gerald Canfield 
Paul Carden 
Alphens Chewning 
Mike Childress 
Shauna Cohen • 





ii: 












/ / 






Nil 








Kathleen 1>diinelly 

Richard Donzell 
Ann Downing 
Leo Drake 
Steven Duff 
Elizabeth Duggan 




Edward Ganger 
Coleman George 

James Gilpatrick 
Ramona Gladen 
Susan Goad 
Mike Grabinsky 



^^^^ -^^g^Hj 





EIGHTH GRADE 



Jack Grimsley 
Audrey Gross • 
Geraldine HaU 
Robert Hampel 
Larry Hamrick 
Gary Hanson 






Steve Holland 
Daniel Holmes 
Ricky Hooper 
Robert Horstman 
Alice Howell 
Karen Hugh« 





Deborah Jones 
Linda Jones 
Marcia Jones 
Susan Jonas 
Jo Anne Kaleel 
Chiistopher Kelly* 





Mary Lang 
Tod Laughton 
Dale Lazar 

^(II^nI: ~ Sheila Leedom 



Diane Leonis 
wis 






Debbie Mango 
Joe Marchione 
Lynn Martin 
Pat McDaniel 
Wyn McFarlane 
Joe McKinney 




^ ^ ^St^ ^"Pl ^^'m Woddy MUes 





Errol Nicoll 
Lisa Noles 
Pamela Norhtcraft 
Toyoia Northcraft 
Jo Anne O'Rouik^ 
erman Owens 



Barbara Harris 
Kent Harris 
Claudia Haivey* 

Teresa Hill 

Teresa Holder 



Daniel Kurd 
Joelle Ingram 
Deborah Inman 
Llewellyn J albert 

Steve Johnson 
Carol Jones 



John Kelsay 

>Lllen Kerns 
Pat King 
Vivan Knaver 

Marian Knaver 
Janice Kruskod 



^ ' ^ Brian Lockie 

^ JeffLoper 

^ ' i WiUiam Luton 

Mitch Lynch 
David Magaw 
Brenda Manby 



1 ' SIP\ *■ ' " ^'^^ Moon 
\t'~ * Debbie Moote 

Wesley Neal 
Eric Neidlinger 
Johnny Nelson 



EIGHTH GRADE 



Anne PilloXv 
Julie Pollie 
Anne Porterfield 
Everlina Privott* 
Donald Pulley 
Miriam Retzke 



Donald Kudy 
Charles Saliba 
Loyd Saunders 
Karen Schmidt 
Cindy Sewell 



George Smith 
Ronald Smith 
Tina Sokol 
Richard Stalker 
Steve Stanley 
Brian Stevens 



Don Thorn a? 
Elizabeth Thompson 
Billy ThiackmortoA 

Carolyn Trimbb 
Gary Luell 
Blair Tyrrell 



Judy Whitaker 
KeUy Whitehead 
Joy William 
Jeryl Williams 
Wayne William 
Connie Wilson 



Bienda Parker 
Susan Parsons 
Cindy Payne 
Judy Osborne 
%ibara Pritzef 
John Phillipi 




Kathy Shanley 
Sheri Sharp 
Jane Simms 
BiUy Smiley 
Cindy Smith 
Charles Smith 




Richard Stuart 
Cathy Summerlin 
Sherry Swagjer 
Ron Swan 
Cindy Thomas 





Vicki Woddeiar 
Debby Waldorf 
LesUe Wallace 
Fred Weaver 
Jeff Weber 
Kiik WeUs 




Tommy Withrow 
Cindy Wizeman 

Doug Wood 
Chris Wright 
David Yarborough 
Don Ziegilbein 




PERLA NEUSS AND HIRAM GUERRA ARE 






The S.C.A. gave a party as a combination of New Years Eve and a welcome to our foreign 
exchange students. Here we see Barbie Byrtus, Becky Parsons and Andrea Benda giving Mr. 
Cox, Sponsor of the S.C.A., some presents. 



Peria Neuss from Brazil and Hiram< 
at the party. 




P.A.'s FOREIGN EXCHANGE STUDENTS 




Guena fiom Panama enjoy dancing 



I 




students to South America. Katiiy 
foreign exchange students to South 





225 



PAGEANT IN PICTURES 





rG9 





arol 





pping Center 



GY 7-2467 



>rC*\ iacu]*^fand the : 




^erage Staff wishes to express its sincere appreciation to the administration, 
>^^*^^^yi*^fand the student body for their help and co-operation in helping to make thisyear- 
'^ok possible. 




1\ 



ecial Acknowledgements To:^_Xy^^ 

^al/taj^ow, fiaipoom AdvfcdJ- 
/UfiamHash, Delmkrjtepresentlmve 



Qkly \ V ^Mr. William Mcintosh, Mcintosh 




228 








to the graduating class 



BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY 

NORFOLK COCA-COLA BOTTLING WORKS, INC. 



229 



4576-8 Pembroke Mall - Va. Beach 
497-4829 



HOLLOMON-BROWN 
FUNERAL HOME 



FOR THE BEST 
IN CAMPUS 
COVERAGE 




READ BOTH 



THE RUG SHOP 



SERVING TIDEWATER 
FOR 

MORE THAN 20 YEARS 

Famous Name Brands 
Complete Home Shopping Service 



THE CLOTHING CHEST 



"Clothing With a Personal Touch" 

317 Laskin Rd., Va. Beach 
Bank of Virginia Charge Plan 
Hours 9-6, Mon.-Sat. 
Ample Parking in Rear of Store 



230 




FASHION & FINISHING SCHOOL 



Arthur A. Boothe, Jr. 
Director 



9-A Pembroke Mall Shopping Center 
4584 Virginia Beach Boulevard 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23462 
Phone 499-0569 



\'^hy Be Something Else 

When You Can Be A POWERS GIRL 



"For the young lady 
who cares what she wears. " 



NAIVETTE SHOPPE 

1 1 1 College Place, Norfolk, Va. 
3303 Atlantic Ave., Virginia Beach, Va. 



Compliments of 



PIEDMONT FABRICS 



6149 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
614 E. Little Creek Rd. 



497-3090 
588-8631 



Compliments of 



FIVEL FURNITURE 



Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Norfolk 2, Virginia 23502 
Phone: 497-8944 



Great Bridge House of Beauty 

547^222 
Great Bridge Shopping Center 

JANAF HOUSE OF BEAUTY 

"Where Hair Styles Originate" 
109 Janaf Shopping Center 
Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Norfolk, Virginia 
Colly Village House of Beauty 

MA 5-5217 
Colly Village Shopping Center 



IThe^flub 

OF TIDEWATER 



Princess Anne Plaza 
Virginia Beach, Va. 



VIRGINIA BEACH FLORIST 

Gifts — Decorative Accessories 

993 Laskin Road 
Virginia Beach, Va. 



Jack W. Brothers 
C. F. Marks 



Phone 
428-1481 



231 



YOUR FRIENDS 

AT 
BALFOUR 



JOIN IN SENDING THEIR 




THE CRAFTSMEN WHO MADE YOUR 
CLASS RING A MASTERPIECE 

and 



CHARLES G. MOTLEY 
31 10 West Marshall Street 
Richmond 30, Virginia 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 

TO A GREAT CLASS IN A FINE SCHOOL 




ATTLEBORO// MASSACHUSETTS 



CLASS RINGS AND PINS • CLUB INSIGNIA • MEDALS • TROPHIES • PLAQUES • DIPLOMAS • COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 



232 



Begin banking 
a better life 



on 



now 



Whether it's a separate check- 
ing account for you, a savings 
account for your vacation earnings, 
or an account for your class or club, 
F&M can help you start off right. 
When you bank on a better life at 
First & Merchants, you'll find bank- 
ing services are always easy and 
:onvenient to use. 



at FIRST & 



MERCHANTS 



FIRST & MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 

Member F.D.I.C. 



Alexan^er-Seeglf 

IMPORTERS & RETAILERS 







2-4 Monticello Arcade 
Norfolk 10, Va. 
Phone-MA 7-4094 



Thank you for shopping at 



FASHIONS FOR THE FAMILY 



Downtown 
Janaf 



Wards Corner 
Princess Anne Plaza 



TAirs 

THOROBRED SEEDS 

"Best by Test" for over 95 years 

Give your garden & lawn the finest start 
with the finest seeds, bulbs & plants 

Tidewater's Leading Seed Store 

TAIT'S SEED STORE 



Corner Tidewater Drive 
& Virginia Beach Blvd. 



Norfolk, Virginia 
Phone 622-3385 



LARASAN REALTY CORP. 



REALTORS 

Residential - Commercial - Property Management 
General Insurance - Life Insurance 

3401 Virginia Beach Blvd., Va. Beach, Virginia 23452 

Tel. 340-3030 



233 



KELLAM- EATON INSURANCE 

REAL ESTATE - RENTALS - INSURANCE 

3113 Pacific Avenue 
2406 B Princess Anne Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 



35th & Atlantic Ave. 
Five Stores in 4 Virginia Cities: 

Norfolk; Downtown & Wards Comer Virginia Beach 

Portsmouth, Midcity Chesapeake, Great Bridge Shopping Center 



THE SPORTSMAN SHOP 



123 W. Main Street 
Norfolk, Va. 

4576-B Pembroke Mall 
Virginia Beach 



"Outfitters 

of the 
Cavaliers" 



BEACH AND BAYNE 
THEATERS 



Atlantic Avenue 
Virginia Beach 



SPERTNER JEWELERS 

Norfolk 14 Southern Shopping Center 
Portsmouth Mid City Shopping Center 
Virginia Beach Pembroke Mall 



Compliments of 



BURROW MARTIN DRUG STORE 



4848 Va. Beach Blvd. 
Va. Beach, Virginia 



234 



"T/ie Studio of Aivard-Winning Photographers^^ 




We are proud to have been selected as your cavalier photographers. 
Please call us for your future portrait needs. 



1 1 -A Pembroke Mall 722 W. 2 1 st Street 

Va. Beach Norfolk 
497-7481 625-2102 



235 





EE'S 



uttinE 




TOWN 






40-5 5 5( 




cean 



Remember, America . . . 
"Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty." 
—Thomas Jefferson 

In the historic land served by Virginia Electric and Power Company. This warning is 
not easy to forget. On every hand, contrasted with the landmark of this progressive, 
growing area, are the monuments to America's unending fight for freedom. 

But freedom cannot be preserved in stone or defended by monuments. Freedom 
must exist in the heart of the individual. It must be championed by the living. 

The freedom to build ... to create ... to grow as free individuals in a free nation is 
our priceless heritage from the past. Its cost is our national vigilance. 



VIRGINIA ELECTRIC AND POWER COMPANY 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 



Your Friendly Jewelers 
For over 40 years 

BARR BROS. 

227 Granby St. 
Janaf Shopping Center 



Newspapers Magazines 
BOOKS 
Paperbacks & Hardcovers 

Greeting cards postcards 
Fast film service 

FIRESIDE NEWS & 
BOOKSHOP 



208 Laskin Road 



428-3013 



Since 1898 

AMES & BROWNLEY 

MA 5-5321 
41 1 Granby Street 
Janaf Shopping Center 









John U. Addenbrook 




President 


BEACH TRAVEL 


SERVICE, INC. 


Virginia Beach, Virginia 


Phone 


2407-B Pacific Avenue 


428-7961 



237 




BLACK ANGUS RESTAURANT 



CHARCOAL BROILED STEAKS 

MEMBER 
AAA DINER'S CLUB 
AMERICAN EXPRESS 
HILTON CARTE BLANCHE 

CATERING TO PARTIES & BANQUETS 




CALL 
JU 7-0497 

1890 E. Little Creek Rd. 
NORFOLK 



CALL 
428-7700 

33rd & Pacific Ave. 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. 



10 Stores to Serve You 




Famous Brand Shoes For All The Family 



APPLIANCES 





SINCE 1905 



Stores in 

. Norfolk 
. Virginia Beach 

. Chesapeake 
. Great Bridge 



Serving Tidewater over 63 Years 



238 




PET 



OM«r omuM 



Its PET... 

you bet!** 



MADE WITH FRESH CREAM 



Mr. & Mrs. D. J. Grover 

Matilyn S. Pugh 

Gracis House of Beauty 

Dr. O. W. Self, Jr. 

Dr. George R. C. McGuire 

Mr. John Hairstyling 

Kempsville Florist & Gift Shop 

Lum's Hardware Corp. 

Dr. Leonard S. Doline 

E. Ray Howell 




Circa 1720 
Virginia Beach, Va 



America's Most Awarded 
Fine Furniture Store 




for the young adult 

. fine furniture 

. carpets 

. Hnens 

. draperies 

. accessories 

. interior design 

Virginia Beach Blvd. at Thalia 
Route 58 



239 




To c^r^ecxl oczVc-^ 
Slog e^'^ , Ck<^cL oVvOc^ 
Sv^cxtM: hid. T-^ 

Call sc.^m^r^^^eJ?tJ^^ 
rTxe.o.viH +o<^ each o^V^, 'vnnQrifcr ' "Ofrn/i^^ Qp^ 



.n U^e. Maoe^... ^^^^^^^ 





Qi ^^^^ 



1 ^ 





r* / > V\ 



I- 

c 

o 

i 



o 




3 

>0 



3 





^1 



3 

> 
? 



C 



9 



i 3 3 




CN ^ O 



r 



vK 



vr 



r 



5>_ S> C 



^ C 



2^. 



o 



Si \j 



O 















Bf«iiiiinn«""